Acquired MET amplification in non-small cell lung cancer is highly associated with the exposure of EGFR inhibitors and may not affect patients' outcome

Wei Yin, Wei Liu, Ming Guo, Zhenya Tang, Gokce Toruner, Melissa Robinson, Joanne Cheng, Shimin Hu, L. Jeffrey Medeiros, Guilin Tang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

MET amplification has been associated with shorter survival in cancer patients and thought to represent one of two major mechanisms for developing resistance to therapy with EGFR inhibitors. We retrospectively studied 99 patients who had non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and had at least two FISH analyses for MET/CEP7 at different time points during the course of disease. Four (4%) patients showed MET amplification in the initial diagnostic biopsy, and 16 (16%) patients acquired MET amplification in the follow-up biopsy specimens. Acquired MET amplification was highly associated with EGFR inhibitor treatment. Except for EGFR and TP53 mutations, other gene mutations were rare in the patients with MET amplification. Patients with acquired MET amplification showed no significant survival difference comparing to the patients who did not show MET amplification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number104572
JournalExperimental and Molecular Pathology
Volume118
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2021

Keywords

  • EGFR inhibitor
  • Lung cancer
  • MET amplification
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

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