Alleles Lost and Gained in Malignant Cells

Pei Jer Chen, Shiou Hwei Yeh, Ding Shinn Chen, Harry B. Burke, Stanley R. Hamilton, Jin Jen, Bert Vogelstein

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

To the Editor: In their study of the correlation between the allelic loss of chromosome 18q and survival among patients with colorectal cancer (July 28 issue),1 Jen et al. used microsatellite polymorphisms to distinguish between two alleles in tumor DNA. A “relative intensity of the two alleles in the tumor DNA [that] differed from the relative intensity in the non-neoplastic tissue DNA by a factor of at least 1.5” was used as the criterion for loss of heterozygosity.2 However, this criterion is not stringent enough to support the loss of heterozygosity in some cases of liver cancer. We used 12…

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1591-1592
Number of pages2
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume331
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 8 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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    Chen, P. J., Yeh, S. H., Chen, D. S., Burke, H. B., Hamilton, S. R., Jen, J., & Vogelstein, B. (1994). Alleles Lost and Gained in Malignant Cells. New England Journal of Medicine, 331(23), 1591-1592. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM199412083312314