Autoantibody formation after alloimmunization inducing bystander immune hemolysis

Mariza Mota, C. Bley, M. G. Aravechia, Nelson Hamerschlak, A. Sakashita, J. M. Kutner, L. Castilho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The development of RBC autoantibodies resulting from or associated with allogeneic blood transfusions is not an easily determined complication of RBC transfusions. This report discusses one patient who developed RBC autoantibodies in association with an allogeneic blood transfusion and alloimmunization leading to a temporary bystander immune hemolysis. A 72-year-old woman was hospitalized as a result of severe anemia and received two units of ABO- and D-compatible RBCs. She had a history of two pregnancies 40 years before, but no history of RBC transfusion, and her antibody screen was negative. On the tenth day after transfusion her hemoglobin dropped, and alloanti-c was identified in her serum and eluate. At this time she received another two units of compatible blood according to her phenotype (group O, R1R1, K:-i). After 48 hours, she developed joint pain, pyrexia, and hemoglobinuria, and her Hb dropped from 9.2 g/dL to 5.3 g/dL. The direct antiglobulin test was positive, an IgG autoantibody was present in the eluate, and the antibody investigation revealed the presence of anti-Jkb in addition to the previously identified alloanti-c. Her genotype was determined, and, based on the findings, two additional units were selected, found to be compatible, and transfused without incident. Transfusions were discontinued, and she was treated with IVIG and corticosteroids. Her Hb increased to 9.7 g/dL, and the patient made an uneventful recovery. It was concluded that transfusion of incompatible RBCs induced the formation of an autoantibody in this patient, resulting in lysis of bystander RBCs. The need for additional blood transfusion was successfully avoided by treatment with IVIG, steroid therapy, and rituximab.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-12
Number of pages4
JournalImmunohematology
Volume25
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Hemolysis
Autoantibodies
Blood Transfusion
Intravenous Immunoglobulins
Hemoglobinuria
Coombs Test
Reproductive History
Antibodies
Arthralgia
Anemia
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Hemoglobins
Fever
Immunoglobulin G
Steroids
Genotype
Phenotype
Therapeutics
Serum

Keywords

  • Alloimmunization
  • Autoantibody
  • Bystander hemolysis
  • RBC transfusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Mota, M., Bley, C., Aravechia, M. G., Hamerschlak, N., Sakashita, A., Kutner, J. M., & Castilho, L. (2009). Autoantibody formation after alloimmunization inducing bystander immune hemolysis. Immunohematology, 25(1), 9-12.

Autoantibody formation after alloimmunization inducing bystander immune hemolysis. / Mota, Mariza; Bley, C.; Aravechia, M. G.; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Sakashita, A.; Kutner, J. M.; Castilho, L.

In: Immunohematology, Vol. 25, No. 1, 2009, p. 9-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mota, M, Bley, C, Aravechia, MG, Hamerschlak, N, Sakashita, A, Kutner, JM & Castilho, L 2009, 'Autoantibody formation after alloimmunization inducing bystander immune hemolysis', Immunohematology, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 9-12.
Mota M, Bley C, Aravechia MG, Hamerschlak N, Sakashita A, Kutner JM et al. Autoantibody formation after alloimmunization inducing bystander immune hemolysis. Immunohematology. 2009;25(1):9-12.
Mota, Mariza ; Bley, C. ; Aravechia, M. G. ; Hamerschlak, Nelson ; Sakashita, A. ; Kutner, J. M. ; Castilho, L. / Autoantibody formation after alloimmunization inducing bystander immune hemolysis. In: Immunohematology. 2009 ; Vol. 25, No. 1. pp. 9-12.
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