Benign prostatic hyperplasia: Racial differences in treatment patterns and prostate cancer prevalence

Curtis A. Pettaway, Lois E. Lamerato, Michael T. Eaddy, Jessie K. Edwards, Susan L. Hogue, Martin M. Crane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study Type - Prevalence (prospective cohort with good follow-up) Level of Evidence 1b What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Previous studies evaluating racial differences in BPH treatment and outcomes have concluded that more attention in the management of lower urinary tract symptoms should be directed at African Americans. Although the relationship between BPH and the development of prostate cancer is inconclusive, longitudinal studies have indicated racial disparities in the incidence of prostate cancer. This is the first long-term follow-up study in a BPH population to assess the incidence of prostate cancer among African American and Caucasian men under "real-world" clinical practice circumstances. This study suggests that African Americans with BPH have a much greater risk of developing prostate cancer than similar Caucasian men, highlighting the need for education, prevention and early detection. OBJECTIVE • To compare prostate cancer, prostate-related surgery and acute urinary retention rates, as well as associated healthcare resource use over 11 years in African American and Caucasian men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). PATIENTS AND METHODS • The BPH-related medical and surgical charges and events were determined for 398 African American men and 1656 Caucasian men followed for a mean of 10.2 years within a health maintenance organization. • Racial differences in clinical outcomes were evaluated using time-to-event analysis, stratifying results by baseline prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values. RESULTS • Risk of a prostate cancer diagnosis was 2.2 times greater in African American than Caucasian men (95% CI 1.48-3.35, P < 0.001) in analyses adjusting for serum PSA level. • Although African Americans were more likely to receive medical therapy for symptoms of BPH than Caucasians (43.5% vs 37.2%, respectively; P= 0.029), there were no clinically meaningful differences with respect to subsequent acute urinary retention or BPH-related surgery between them, or BPH-related medical charges (US $407 vs US $405 per month). CONCLUSION • As evidenced by this analysis of 'real-world' clinical practice, African Americans with BPH have a much greater risk of developing prostate cancer than similar Caucasian men highlighting the need for education and early detection in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1302-1308
Number of pages7
JournalBJU International
Volume108
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2011

Keywords

  • acute urinary retention
  • benign prostatic hyperplasia
  • lower urinary tract symptoms
  • prostate cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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