Breast cancer risk in relation to plasma metabolites among Hispanic and African American women

Hua Zhao, Jie Shen, Steven C. Moore, Yuanqing Ye, Xifeng Wu, Krista A. Zanetti, Francisco J. Esteva, Debasish Tripathy, Wong Ho Chow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The metabolic etiology of breast cancer has been explored in the past several years using metabolomics. However, most of these studies only included non-Hispanic White individuals. Methods: To fill this gap, we performed a two-step (discovery and validation) metabolomics profiling in plasma samples from 358 breast cancer patients and 138 healthy controls. All study subjects were either Hispanics or non-Hispanic African Americans. Results: A panel of 14 identified metabolites significantly differed between breast cancer cases and healthy controls in both the discovery and validation sets. Most of these identified metabolites were lipids. In the pathway analysis, citrate cycle (TCA cycle), arginine and proline metabolism, and linoleic acid metabolism pathways were observed, and they significantly differed between breast cancer cases and healthy controls in both sets. From those 14 metabolites, we selected 9 non-correlated metabolites to generate a metabolic risk score. Increased metabolites risk score was associated with a 1.87- and 1.63-fold increased risk of breast cancer in the discovery and validation sets, respectively (Odds ratio (OR) 1.87, 95% Confidence interval (CI) 1.50, 2.32; OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.36, 1.95). Conclusions: In summary, our study identified metabolic profiles and pathways that significantly differed between breast cancer cases and healthy controls in Hispanic or non-Hispanic African American women. The results from our study might provide new insights on the metabolic etiology of breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBreast Cancer Research and Treatment
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Breast Neoplasms
Metabolomics
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Metabolome
Linoleic Acid
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
Proline
Citric Acid
Arginine
Lipids

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Metabolomics
  • Racial minority

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Breast cancer risk in relation to plasma metabolites among Hispanic and African American women. / Zhao, Hua; Shen, Jie; Moore, Steven C.; Ye, Yuanqing; Wu, Xifeng; Zanetti, Krista A.; Esteva, Francisco J.; Tripathy, Debasish; Chow, Wong Ho.

In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7ca3dc9dc4b14a33911c78a8be29fb24,
title = "Breast cancer risk in relation to plasma metabolites among Hispanic and African American women",
abstract = "Purpose: The metabolic etiology of breast cancer has been explored in the past several years using metabolomics. However, most of these studies only included non-Hispanic White individuals. Methods: To fill this gap, we performed a two-step (discovery and validation) metabolomics profiling in plasma samples from 358 breast cancer patients and 138 healthy controls. All study subjects were either Hispanics or non-Hispanic African Americans. Results: A panel of 14 identified metabolites significantly differed between breast cancer cases and healthy controls in both the discovery and validation sets. Most of these identified metabolites were lipids. In the pathway analysis, citrate cycle (TCA cycle), arginine and proline metabolism, and linoleic acid metabolism pathways were observed, and they significantly differed between breast cancer cases and healthy controls in both sets. From those 14 metabolites, we selected 9 non-correlated metabolites to generate a metabolic risk score. Increased metabolites risk score was associated with a 1.87- and 1.63-fold increased risk of breast cancer in the discovery and validation sets, respectively (Odds ratio (OR) 1.87, 95{\%} Confidence interval (CI) 1.50, 2.32; OR 1.63, 95{\%} CI 1.36, 1.95). Conclusions: In summary, our study identified metabolic profiles and pathways that significantly differed between breast cancer cases and healthy controls in Hispanic or non-Hispanic African American women. The results from our study might provide new insights on the metabolic etiology of breast cancer.",
keywords = "Breast cancer, Metabolomics, Racial minority",
author = "Hua Zhao and Jie Shen and Moore, {Steven C.} and Yuanqing Ye and Xifeng Wu and Zanetti, {Krista A.} and Esteva, {Francisco J.} and Debasish Tripathy and Chow, {Wong Ho}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10549-019-05165-4",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Breast Cancer Research and Treatment",
issn = "0167-6806",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Breast cancer risk in relation to plasma metabolites among Hispanic and African American women

AU - Zhao, Hua

AU - Shen, Jie

AU - Moore, Steven C.

AU - Ye, Yuanqing

AU - Wu, Xifeng

AU - Zanetti, Krista A.

AU - Esteva, Francisco J.

AU - Tripathy, Debasish

AU - Chow, Wong Ho

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Purpose: The metabolic etiology of breast cancer has been explored in the past several years using metabolomics. However, most of these studies only included non-Hispanic White individuals. Methods: To fill this gap, we performed a two-step (discovery and validation) metabolomics profiling in plasma samples from 358 breast cancer patients and 138 healthy controls. All study subjects were either Hispanics or non-Hispanic African Americans. Results: A panel of 14 identified metabolites significantly differed between breast cancer cases and healthy controls in both the discovery and validation sets. Most of these identified metabolites were lipids. In the pathway analysis, citrate cycle (TCA cycle), arginine and proline metabolism, and linoleic acid metabolism pathways were observed, and they significantly differed between breast cancer cases and healthy controls in both sets. From those 14 metabolites, we selected 9 non-correlated metabolites to generate a metabolic risk score. Increased metabolites risk score was associated with a 1.87- and 1.63-fold increased risk of breast cancer in the discovery and validation sets, respectively (Odds ratio (OR) 1.87, 95% Confidence interval (CI) 1.50, 2.32; OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.36, 1.95). Conclusions: In summary, our study identified metabolic profiles and pathways that significantly differed between breast cancer cases and healthy controls in Hispanic or non-Hispanic African American women. The results from our study might provide new insights on the metabolic etiology of breast cancer.

AB - Purpose: The metabolic etiology of breast cancer has been explored in the past several years using metabolomics. However, most of these studies only included non-Hispanic White individuals. Methods: To fill this gap, we performed a two-step (discovery and validation) metabolomics profiling in plasma samples from 358 breast cancer patients and 138 healthy controls. All study subjects were either Hispanics or non-Hispanic African Americans. Results: A panel of 14 identified metabolites significantly differed between breast cancer cases and healthy controls in both the discovery and validation sets. Most of these identified metabolites were lipids. In the pathway analysis, citrate cycle (TCA cycle), arginine and proline metabolism, and linoleic acid metabolism pathways were observed, and they significantly differed between breast cancer cases and healthy controls in both sets. From those 14 metabolites, we selected 9 non-correlated metabolites to generate a metabolic risk score. Increased metabolites risk score was associated with a 1.87- and 1.63-fold increased risk of breast cancer in the discovery and validation sets, respectively (Odds ratio (OR) 1.87, 95% Confidence interval (CI) 1.50, 2.32; OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.36, 1.95). Conclusions: In summary, our study identified metabolic profiles and pathways that significantly differed between breast cancer cases and healthy controls in Hispanic or non-Hispanic African American women. The results from our study might provide new insights on the metabolic etiology of breast cancer.

KW - Breast cancer

KW - Metabolomics

KW - Racial minority

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061620455&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85061620455&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10549-019-05165-4

DO - 10.1007/s10549-019-05165-4

M3 - Article

C2 - 30771047

AN - SCOPUS:85061620455

JO - Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

JF - Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

SN - 0167-6806

ER -