Can anthracycline therapy for pediatric malignancies be less cardiotoxic?

Joy M. Fulbright, Winston Huh, Pete Anderson, Joya Chandra

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Anthracyclines have a central role in the treatment of cancer in pediatric patients but confer an increased risk of cardiac dysfunction. Several strategies have been employed to help reduce anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity, including pretreating the patient with the iron chelator dexrazoxane and infusing the dose of anthracycline over a longer period. Much focus has also been placed on the development of methods that decrease the toxicity of parent compounds, specifically through the use of drug carriers such as liposomes, and on the development of new, potentially less toxic anthracycline derivatives, such as amrubicin and pixantrone. We provide a review of these strategies, focusing on studies in pediatric patients when available, and support the idea that anthracycline therapy can be less cardiotoxic in pediatric patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)411-419
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent oncology reports
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

Fingerprint

Anthracyclines
Pediatrics
Neoplasms
Dexrazoxane
Therapeutics
Drug Carriers
Poisons
Chelating Agents
Liposomes
Iron

Keywords

  • Amrubicin
  • Anthracyclines
  • Cardiotoxicity
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Daunorubicin
  • Dexrazoxane
  • Doxorubicin
  • Epirubicin
  • Idarubicin
  • Mitoxantrone
  • Pediatrics
  • Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin
  • Pixantrone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Can anthracycline therapy for pediatric malignancies be less cardiotoxic? / Fulbright, Joy M.; Huh, Winston; Anderson, Pete; Chandra, Joya.

In: Current oncology reports, Vol. 12, No. 6, 01.11.2010, p. 411-419.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Fulbright, Joy M. ; Huh, Winston ; Anderson, Pete ; Chandra, Joya. / Can anthracycline therapy for pediatric malignancies be less cardiotoxic?. In: Current oncology reports. 2010 ; Vol. 12, No. 6. pp. 411-419.
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