Clinical analysis of reactive thymic hyperplasia following chemotherapy for childhood malignant lymphoma

Zi Jun Zhen, Xiao-Fei Sun, Yun-Fei Xia, Zhi Hui Wang, Jia Yu Ling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: Reactive thymic hyperplasia following chemotherapy for malignant tumors is likely to be misdiagnosed as tumor residue or relapse, therefore, leads to unnecessary treatment. This study was to analyze the clinical features of reactive thymic hyperplasia following chemotherapy for childhood malignant lymphoma. METHODS: Clinical data of 13 children with reactive thymic hyperplasia following chemotherapy for malignant lymphoma, treated from Mar. 1999 to Mar. 2004, were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 13 cases, 5 were Hodgkin's disease (HD), and 8 were non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). All patients received computed tomography (CT) to evaluate the therapeutic effect. When a new thymic mass emerged, positive electron tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was performed to identify its quality. RESULTS: At diagnosis, 10 patients had mediastinal involvement. Reactive thymic hyperplasia occurred following the completion of chemotherapy in 9 cases, or during the maintenance of chemotherapy in 4 cases. CT showed that the longest diameters of the new mediastinal masses were 2.2-6.0 cm (mean 3.7 cm). The interval from last chemotherapy cycle to the occurrence of thymic hyperplasia was 2-12 months (mean 4 months). PET/CT was performed to 5 cases, and showed no vital tumors in the mediastinum. Three cases were misdiagnosed as tumor residue or relapse, and received second-line therapy. All patients were followed-up for 1-6 years (median 4 years), and none suffered tumor relapse. CONCLUSIONS: Reactive thymic hyperplasia may occur following intensive chemotherapy for childhood malignant lymphoma. It should not be misdiagnosed as malignant tumors and overtreated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)471-475
Number of pages5
JournalAi zheng = Aizheng = Chinese journal of cancer
Volume25
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 2006

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Thymus Hyperplasia
Lymphoma
Drug Therapy
Diagnostic Errors
Tomography
Electron Microscope Tomography
Neoplasms
Recurrence
Maintenance Chemotherapy
Mediastinum
Therapeutic Uses
Hodgkin Disease
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Clinical analysis of reactive thymic hyperplasia following chemotherapy for childhood malignant lymphoma. / Zhen, Zi Jun; Sun, Xiao-Fei; Xia, Yun-Fei; Wang, Zhi Hui; Ling, Jia Yu.

In: Ai zheng = Aizheng = Chinese journal of cancer, Vol. 25, No. 4, 04.2006, p. 471-475.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: Reactive thymic hyperplasia following chemotherapy for malignant tumors is likely to be misdiagnosed as tumor residue or relapse, therefore, leads to unnecessary treatment. This study was to analyze the clinical features of reactive thymic hyperplasia following chemotherapy for childhood malignant lymphoma. METHODS: Clinical data of 13 children with reactive thymic hyperplasia following chemotherapy for malignant lymphoma, treated from Mar. 1999 to Mar. 2004, were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 13 cases, 5 were Hodgkin's disease (HD), and 8 were non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). All patients received computed tomography (CT) to evaluate the therapeutic effect. When a new thymic mass emerged, positive electron tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was performed to identify its quality. RESULTS: At diagnosis, 10 patients had mediastinal involvement. Reactive thymic hyperplasia occurred following the completion of chemotherapy in 9 cases, or during the maintenance of chemotherapy in 4 cases. CT showed that the longest diameters of the new mediastinal masses were 2.2-6.0 cm (mean 3.7 cm). The interval from last chemotherapy cycle to the occurrence of thymic hyperplasia was 2-12 months (mean 4 months). PET/CT was performed to 5 cases, and showed no vital tumors in the mediastinum. Three cases were misdiagnosed as tumor residue or relapse, and received second-line therapy. All patients were followed-up for 1-6 years (median 4 years), and none suffered tumor relapse. CONCLUSIONS: Reactive thymic hyperplasia may occur following intensive chemotherapy for childhood malignant lymphoma. It should not be misdiagnosed as malignant tumors and overtreated.",
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N2 - BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: Reactive thymic hyperplasia following chemotherapy for malignant tumors is likely to be misdiagnosed as tumor residue or relapse, therefore, leads to unnecessary treatment. This study was to analyze the clinical features of reactive thymic hyperplasia following chemotherapy for childhood malignant lymphoma. METHODS: Clinical data of 13 children with reactive thymic hyperplasia following chemotherapy for malignant lymphoma, treated from Mar. 1999 to Mar. 2004, were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 13 cases, 5 were Hodgkin's disease (HD), and 8 were non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). All patients received computed tomography (CT) to evaluate the therapeutic effect. When a new thymic mass emerged, positive electron tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was performed to identify its quality. RESULTS: At diagnosis, 10 patients had mediastinal involvement. Reactive thymic hyperplasia occurred following the completion of chemotherapy in 9 cases, or during the maintenance of chemotherapy in 4 cases. CT showed that the longest diameters of the new mediastinal masses were 2.2-6.0 cm (mean 3.7 cm). The interval from last chemotherapy cycle to the occurrence of thymic hyperplasia was 2-12 months (mean 4 months). PET/CT was performed to 5 cases, and showed no vital tumors in the mediastinum. Three cases were misdiagnosed as tumor residue or relapse, and received second-line therapy. All patients were followed-up for 1-6 years (median 4 years), and none suffered tumor relapse. CONCLUSIONS: Reactive thymic hyperplasia may occur following intensive chemotherapy for childhood malignant lymphoma. It should not be misdiagnosed as malignant tumors and overtreated.

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