Cognitive-behavioral treatment of late-life generalized anxiety disorder

Melinda A. Stanley, J. Gayle Beck, Diane M Novy, Patricia M. Averill, Alan C. Swann, Gretchen J. Diefenbach, Derek R. Hopko

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    179 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This study addressed the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), relative to minimal contact control (MCC), in a sample of 85 older adults (age 60 years and over) with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). All participants completed measures of primary outcome (worry and anxiety), coexistent symptoms (depressive symptoms and specific fears), and quality of life. Results of both completer and intent-to-treat analyses revealed significant improvement in worry, anxiety, depression, and quality of life following CBT relative to MCC. Forty-five percent of patients in CBT were classified as responders, relative to 8% in MCC. Most gains for patients in CBT were maintained or enhanced over 1-year follow-up. However, posttreatment scores for patients in CBT failed to indicate return to normative functioning.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)309-319
    Number of pages11
    JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
    Volume71
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Apr 1 2003

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    Cognitive Therapy
    Anxiety Disorders
    Anxiety
    Quality of Life
    Depression
    Therapeutics
    Fear
    Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Clinical Psychology
    • Psychiatry and Mental health

    Cite this

    Stanley, M. A., Beck, J. G., Novy, D. M., Averill, P. M., Swann, A. C., Diefenbach, G. J., & Hopko, D. R. (2003). Cognitive-behavioral treatment of late-life generalized anxiety disorder. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 71(2), 309-319. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-006X.71.2.309

    Cognitive-behavioral treatment of late-life generalized anxiety disorder. / Stanley, Melinda A.; Beck, J. Gayle; Novy, Diane M; Averill, Patricia M.; Swann, Alan C.; Diefenbach, Gretchen J.; Hopko, Derek R.

    In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 71, No. 2, 01.04.2003, p. 309-319.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Stanley, MA, Beck, JG, Novy, DM, Averill, PM, Swann, AC, Diefenbach, GJ & Hopko, DR 2003, 'Cognitive-behavioral treatment of late-life generalized anxiety disorder', Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 71, no. 2, pp. 309-319. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-006X.71.2.309
    Stanley, Melinda A. ; Beck, J. Gayle ; Novy, Diane M ; Averill, Patricia M. ; Swann, Alan C. ; Diefenbach, Gretchen J. ; Hopko, Derek R. / Cognitive-behavioral treatment of late-life generalized anxiety disorder. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 2003 ; Vol. 71, No. 2. pp. 309-319.
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