Contribution of p53 to metastasis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

126 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The tumor suppressor p53 is lost or mutated in about half of all human cancers, and in those tumors in which it is wild-type, mechanisms exist to prevent its activation. p53 loss not only prevents incipient tumor cells from undergoing oncogene-induced senescence and apoptosis, but also perturbs cell-cycle checkpoints. This enables p53-deficient tumor cells with DNA damage to continue cycling, creating a permissive environment for the acquisition of additional mutations. Theoretically, this could contribute to the evolution of a cancer genome that is conducive to metastasis. Importantly, p53 loss also results in the disruption of pathways that inhibit metastasis, and transcriptionally defective TP53 mutants are known to gain additional functions that promote metastasis. Here, we review the evidence supporting a role for p53 loss or mutation in tumor metastasis, with an emphasis on breast cancer. Significance: The metastatic potential of tumor cells can be positively infl uenced by loss of p53 or expression of p53 gain-of-function mutants. Understanding the mechanisms by which p53 loss and mutation promote tumor metastasis is crucial to understanding the biology of tumor progression and how to appropriately apply targeted therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)405-414
Number of pages10
JournalCancer discovery
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014

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Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasms
Mutation
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Oncogenes
DNA Damage
Genome
Apoptosis
Breast Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Contribution of p53 to metastasis. / Powell, Emily; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen.

In: Cancer discovery, Vol. 4, No. 4, 04.2014, p. 405-414.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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abstract = "The tumor suppressor p53 is lost or mutated in about half of all human cancers, and in those tumors in which it is wild-type, mechanisms exist to prevent its activation. p53 loss not only prevents incipient tumor cells from undergoing oncogene-induced senescence and apoptosis, but also perturbs cell-cycle checkpoints. This enables p53-deficient tumor cells with DNA damage to continue cycling, creating a permissive environment for the acquisition of additional mutations. Theoretically, this could contribute to the evolution of a cancer genome that is conducive to metastasis. Importantly, p53 loss also results in the disruption of pathways that inhibit metastasis, and transcriptionally defective TP53 mutants are known to gain additional functions that promote metastasis. Here, we review the evidence supporting a role for p53 loss or mutation in tumor metastasis, with an emphasis on breast cancer. Significance: The metastatic potential of tumor cells can be positively infl uenced by loss of p53 or expression of p53 gain-of-function mutants. Understanding the mechanisms by which p53 loss and mutation promote tumor metastasis is crucial to understanding the biology of tumor progression and how to appropriately apply targeted therapies.",
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