Decreasing waiting time for treatment before and during implementation of cancer patient pathways in Norway

Yngvar Nilssen, Odd Terje Brustugun, Morten Tandberg Eriksen, Johanne Gulbrandsen, Erik Skaaheim Haug, Bjorn Naume, Bjørn Møller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: In 2015, Norway implemented cancer patient pathways to reduce waiting times for treatment. The aims of this paper were to describe patterns in waiting time and their association with patient characteristics for colorectal, lung, breast and prostate cancers. Methods: National, population-based data from 2007 to 2016 were used. A multivariable quantile regression examined the association between treatment period, age, stage, sex, place of residence, and median waiting times. Results: Reduction in median waiting times for radiotherapy among colorectal, lung and prostate cancer patients ranged from 14 to 50 days. Median waiting time for surgery remained approximately 21 days for both colorectal and breast cancers, while it decreased by 7 and 36 days for lung and prostate cancers, respectively. The proportion of lung and prostate cancer patients with metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis decreased, while the proportion of colorectal patients with localised disease and patients with stage I breast cancer increased (p < 0.001). After adjusting for case-mix, a patient's place of residence was significantly associated with waiting time for treatment (p < 0.001), however, differences in waiting time to treatment decreased over the study period. Conclusions: Between 2007 and 2016, Norway experienced improved stage distributions and consistently decreasing waiting times for treatment. While these improvements occurred gradually, no significant change was observed from the time of cancer patient pathway implementation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-69
Number of pages11
JournalCancer Epidemiology
Volume61
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019

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Norway
Neoplasms
Lung Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Colorectal Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Radiotherapy

Keywords

  • Breast
  • Cancer epidemiology
  • Colorectal
  • Lung
  • Prostate
  • Radiotherapy
  • Surgery
  • Waiting times

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Decreasing waiting time for treatment before and during implementation of cancer patient pathways in Norway. / Nilssen, Yngvar; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Tandberg Eriksen, Morten; Gulbrandsen, Johanne; Skaaheim Haug, Erik; Naume, Bjorn; Møller, Bjørn.

In: Cancer Epidemiology, Vol. 61, 01.08.2019, p. 59-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nilssen, Yngvar ; Brustugun, Odd Terje ; Tandberg Eriksen, Morten ; Gulbrandsen, Johanne ; Skaaheim Haug, Erik ; Naume, Bjorn ; Møller, Bjørn. / Decreasing waiting time for treatment before and during implementation of cancer patient pathways in Norway. In: Cancer Epidemiology. 2019 ; Vol. 61. pp. 59-69.
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