Extracranial schwannoma in the carotid space: A retrospective review of 91 cases

Xiaoke Zheng, Kai Guo, Hongshi Wang, Duanshu Li, Yi Wu, Qinghai Ji, Qiang Shen, Tuanqi Sun, Jun Xiang, Wei Zeng, Yaling Chen, Zhuoying Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Schwannomas of the vagus nerve and cervical sympathetic nerve are rare; hence, only limited information exists regarding their diagnosis and clinical management. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of the clinical features, imaging studies, and treatment results of patients with schwannoma of the vagus nerve and schwannoma of the sympathetic nerve. Results: Of 91 patients, 91% (n = 83) were preoperatively diagnosed with schwannoma tumors. Using the hyoid bone as an anatomic landmark, the location of the schwannoma of the vagus nerve in the carotid space was significantly different to the location of schwannoma of the sympathetic nerve (p =.003). Although 52 of the 76 patients followed up (68%) had postoperative nerve weaknesses, 13 patients (50%) and 14 patients (53.8%), respectively, fully recovered from schwannoma of the vagus nerve and schwannoma of the sympathetic nerve. Conclusion: In the carotid space, schwannomas of the vagus nerve are usually located below the hyoid bone, whereas schwannomas of the sympathetic nerve more commonly arise from the suprahyoid compartment. Accurate preoperative diagnosis and the intracapsular enucleation surgical approach decreased the incidence of postoperative morbidity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-47
Number of pages6
JournalHead and Neck
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Neurilemmoma
Vagus Nerve
Hyoid Bone
Anatomic Landmarks
Morbidity
Incidence

Keywords

  • carotid space
  • cervical sympathetic nerve
  • extracranial
  • schwannomas
  • vagus nerve

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Extracranial schwannoma in the carotid space : A retrospective review of 91 cases. / Zheng, Xiaoke; Guo, Kai; Wang, Hongshi; Li, Duanshu; Wu, Yi; Ji, Qinghai; Shen, Qiang; Sun, Tuanqi; Xiang, Jun; Zeng, Wei; Chen, Yaling; Wang, Zhuoying.

In: Head and Neck, Vol. 39, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 42-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zheng, X, Guo, K, Wang, H, Li, D, Wu, Y, Ji, Q, Shen, Q, Sun, T, Xiang, J, Zeng, W, Chen, Y & Wang, Z 2017, 'Extracranial schwannoma in the carotid space: A retrospective review of 91 cases', Head and Neck, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 42-47. https://doi.org/10.1002/hed.24523
Zheng, Xiaoke ; Guo, Kai ; Wang, Hongshi ; Li, Duanshu ; Wu, Yi ; Ji, Qinghai ; Shen, Qiang ; Sun, Tuanqi ; Xiang, Jun ; Zeng, Wei ; Chen, Yaling ; Wang, Zhuoying. / Extracranial schwannoma in the carotid space : A retrospective review of 91 cases. In: Head and Neck. 2017 ; Vol. 39, No. 1. pp. 42-47.
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AU - Wang, Hongshi

AU - Li, Duanshu

AU - Wu, Yi

AU - Ji, Qinghai

AU - Shen, Qiang

AU - Sun, Tuanqi

AU - Xiang, Jun

AU - Zeng, Wei

AU - Chen, Yaling

AU - Wang, Zhuoying

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AB - Background: Schwannomas of the vagus nerve and cervical sympathetic nerve are rare; hence, only limited information exists regarding their diagnosis and clinical management. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of the clinical features, imaging studies, and treatment results of patients with schwannoma of the vagus nerve and schwannoma of the sympathetic nerve. Results: Of 91 patients, 91% (n = 83) were preoperatively diagnosed with schwannoma tumors. Using the hyoid bone as an anatomic landmark, the location of the schwannoma of the vagus nerve in the carotid space was significantly different to the location of schwannoma of the sympathetic nerve (p =.003). Although 52 of the 76 patients followed up (68%) had postoperative nerve weaknesses, 13 patients (50%) and 14 patients (53.8%), respectively, fully recovered from schwannoma of the vagus nerve and schwannoma of the sympathetic nerve. Conclusion: In the carotid space, schwannomas of the vagus nerve are usually located below the hyoid bone, whereas schwannomas of the sympathetic nerve more commonly arise from the suprahyoid compartment. Accurate preoperative diagnosis and the intracapsular enucleation surgical approach decreased the incidence of postoperative morbidity.

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