High-Intensity Interval Training is Feasible in Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer

Adriana M Coletta, Abenaa M Brewster, Minxing Chen, Yisheng Li, Therese B Bevers, Karen Basen-Engquist, Susan C Gilchrist

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: This trial aimed to demonstrate feasibility of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) in post-menopausal, overweight/obese women at high-risk of invasive breast cancer, and explore HIIT on changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), body weight, and body mass index (BMI) compared to moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) and usual care (UC).

METHODS: Forty-four women were randomized to HIIT, MICT or UC for a 12-week, thrice weekly, supervised exercise intervention. HIIT included a 5-minute warm-up at 50-70% peak heart rate (HR), four cycles of four minutes at 90-100% peak HR followed by three minutes at 50-70% peak HR. MICT consisted of 41 minutes at 60-70% peak HR. Feasibility was assessed by consent, adherence, compliance and retention rates. CRF, body weight and BMI were measured at baseline and end-of-study. Repeated measures linear mixed models were used to assess within- and between-group differences.

RESULTS: Average age was 63.9±8.8 years. BMI was 30.9±5.7 kg/m2. Participants completed 90% and 89% of HIIT and MICT workouts respectively, with 100% compliance to the exercise prescriptions. No serious adverse events were reported. Compared to MICT and UC, HIIT exhibited improvements in change in treadmill time (101 seconds greater than MICT, and 125 seconds greater than UC, respectively, p<0.001). Compared to UC, HIIT exhibited improvement in changes in absolute and relative VO2peak (a 0.15 increase in L/min, p=0.005; and 2.3 increase in ml/kg/min, p=0.004). There were no significant differences between groups for body weight or BMI (p>0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: HIIT is feasible, safe, and appears to promote greater improvements in CRF compared to MICT and UC in women at high risk for breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - Jun 20 2019
Externally publishedYes

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Breast Neoplasms
Heart Rate
Body Mass Index
Body Weight
Exercise
High-Intensity Interval Training
Compliance
Prescriptions
Linear Models
Cardiorespiratory Fitness

Cite this

@article{d858196acfb34743be90b271a53bacb0,
title = "High-Intensity Interval Training is Feasible in Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer",
abstract = "PURPOSE: This trial aimed to demonstrate feasibility of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) in post-menopausal, overweight/obese women at high-risk of invasive breast cancer, and explore HIIT on changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), body weight, and body mass index (BMI) compared to moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) and usual care (UC).METHODS: Forty-four women were randomized to HIIT, MICT or UC for a 12-week, thrice weekly, supervised exercise intervention. HIIT included a 5-minute warm-up at 50-70{\%} peak heart rate (HR), four cycles of four minutes at 90-100{\%} peak HR followed by three minutes at 50-70{\%} peak HR. MICT consisted of 41 minutes at 60-70{\%} peak HR. Feasibility was assessed by consent, adherence, compliance and retention rates. CRF, body weight and BMI were measured at baseline and end-of-study. Repeated measures linear mixed models were used to assess within- and between-group differences.RESULTS: Average age was 63.9±8.8 years. BMI was 30.9±5.7 kg/m2. Participants completed 90{\%} and 89{\%} of HIIT and MICT workouts respectively, with 100{\%} compliance to the exercise prescriptions. No serious adverse events were reported. Compared to MICT and UC, HIIT exhibited improvements in change in treadmill time (101 seconds greater than MICT, and 125 seconds greater than UC, respectively, p<0.001). Compared to UC, HIIT exhibited improvement in changes in absolute and relative VO2peak (a 0.15 increase in L/min, p=0.005; and 2.3 increase in ml/kg/min, p=0.004). There were no significant differences between groups for body weight or BMI (p>0.05).CONCLUSIONS: HIIT is feasible, safe, and appears to promote greater improvements in CRF compared to MICT and UC in women at high risk for breast cancer.",
author = "Coletta, {Adriana M} and Brewster, {Abenaa M} and Minxing Chen and Yisheng Li and Bevers, {Therese B} and Karen Basen-Engquist and Gilchrist, {Susan C}",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1249/MSS.0000000000002048",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise",
issn = "0195-9131",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - High-Intensity Interval Training is Feasible in Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer

AU - Coletta, Adriana M

AU - Brewster, Abenaa M

AU - Chen, Minxing

AU - Li, Yisheng

AU - Bevers, Therese B

AU - Basen-Engquist, Karen

AU - Gilchrist, Susan C

PY - 2019/6/20

Y1 - 2019/6/20

N2 - PURPOSE: This trial aimed to demonstrate feasibility of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) in post-menopausal, overweight/obese women at high-risk of invasive breast cancer, and explore HIIT on changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), body weight, and body mass index (BMI) compared to moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) and usual care (UC).METHODS: Forty-four women were randomized to HIIT, MICT or UC for a 12-week, thrice weekly, supervised exercise intervention. HIIT included a 5-minute warm-up at 50-70% peak heart rate (HR), four cycles of four minutes at 90-100% peak HR followed by three minutes at 50-70% peak HR. MICT consisted of 41 minutes at 60-70% peak HR. Feasibility was assessed by consent, adherence, compliance and retention rates. CRF, body weight and BMI were measured at baseline and end-of-study. Repeated measures linear mixed models were used to assess within- and between-group differences.RESULTS: Average age was 63.9±8.8 years. BMI was 30.9±5.7 kg/m2. Participants completed 90% and 89% of HIIT and MICT workouts respectively, with 100% compliance to the exercise prescriptions. No serious adverse events were reported. Compared to MICT and UC, HIIT exhibited improvements in change in treadmill time (101 seconds greater than MICT, and 125 seconds greater than UC, respectively, p<0.001). Compared to UC, HIIT exhibited improvement in changes in absolute and relative VO2peak (a 0.15 increase in L/min, p=0.005; and 2.3 increase in ml/kg/min, p=0.004). There were no significant differences between groups for body weight or BMI (p>0.05).CONCLUSIONS: HIIT is feasible, safe, and appears to promote greater improvements in CRF compared to MICT and UC in women at high risk for breast cancer.

AB - PURPOSE: This trial aimed to demonstrate feasibility of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) in post-menopausal, overweight/obese women at high-risk of invasive breast cancer, and explore HIIT on changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), body weight, and body mass index (BMI) compared to moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) and usual care (UC).METHODS: Forty-four women were randomized to HIIT, MICT or UC for a 12-week, thrice weekly, supervised exercise intervention. HIIT included a 5-minute warm-up at 50-70% peak heart rate (HR), four cycles of four minutes at 90-100% peak HR followed by three minutes at 50-70% peak HR. MICT consisted of 41 minutes at 60-70% peak HR. Feasibility was assessed by consent, adherence, compliance and retention rates. CRF, body weight and BMI were measured at baseline and end-of-study. Repeated measures linear mixed models were used to assess within- and between-group differences.RESULTS: Average age was 63.9±8.8 years. BMI was 30.9±5.7 kg/m2. Participants completed 90% and 89% of HIIT and MICT workouts respectively, with 100% compliance to the exercise prescriptions. No serious adverse events were reported. Compared to MICT and UC, HIIT exhibited improvements in change in treadmill time (101 seconds greater than MICT, and 125 seconds greater than UC, respectively, p<0.001). Compared to UC, HIIT exhibited improvement in changes in absolute and relative VO2peak (a 0.15 increase in L/min, p=0.005; and 2.3 increase in ml/kg/min, p=0.004). There were no significant differences between groups for body weight or BMI (p>0.05).CONCLUSIONS: HIIT is feasible, safe, and appears to promote greater improvements in CRF compared to MICT and UC in women at high risk for breast cancer.

U2 - 10.1249/MSS.0000000000002048

DO - 10.1249/MSS.0000000000002048

M3 - Article

C2 - 31269007

JO - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

JF - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

SN - 0195-9131

ER -