Immune suppression and skin cancer development: Regulation by NKT cells

Angus M. Moodycliffe, Dat Nghiem, Gavin Clydesdale, Stephen E. Ullrich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

266 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is carcinogenic and immunosuppressive. UV-induced immune suppression is mediated by antigen-specific T cells, which can transfer suppression to normal recipients. These cells are essential for controlling skin cancer development in the UV-irradiated host and in suppressing other immune responses, such as delayed-type hypersensitivity. Despite their importance in skin cancer development, their exact identity has remained elusive. We show here that natural killer T cells from UV-irradiated donor mice function as suppressor T cells and play a critical role in regulating the growth of UV-induced skin cancers and suppressing adaptive immune responses in vivo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)521-525
Number of pages5
JournalNature Immunology
Volume1
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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    Moodycliffe, A. M., Nghiem, D., Clydesdale, G., & Ullrich, S. E. (2000). Immune suppression and skin cancer development: Regulation by NKT cells. Nature Immunology, 1(6), 521-525. https://doi.org/10.1038/82782