In situ hybridization and detection using nonisotopic probes.

Joan H M Knoll, Peter Lichter, Khldoun Bakdounes, Isam Eldin A Eltoum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nonisotopic in situ hybridization can be used to determine the cellular location and relative levels of expression for specific transcripts within cells and tissues. RNA in specimen preparations is hybridized with a biotin- or digoxigenin-labeled probe, which is generally detected by fluorescence or enzymatic methods. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), probably the most widely used method, is described here, along with amplification of weak FISH signals. Nonisotopic probes can also be detected by enzymatic reactions using horseradish peroxidase or alkaline phosphatase, as described here. (c) 2007 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCurrent protocols in molecular biology / edited by Frederick M. Ausubel ... [et al.]
VolumeChapter 14
StatePublished - Jul 2007

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Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
In Situ Hybridization
Digoxigenin
Horseradish Peroxidase
Biotin
Alkaline Phosphatase
Fluorescence
RNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

In situ hybridization and detection using nonisotopic probes. / Knoll, Joan H M; Lichter, Peter; Bakdounes, Khldoun; Eltoum, Isam Eldin A.

In: Current protocols in molecular biology / edited by Frederick M. Ausubel ... [et al.], Vol. Chapter 14, 07.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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