Magnetic resonance imaging-guided biopsy of mammographically and clinically occult breast lesions

Isabelle Bedrosian, James Schlencker, Francis R. Spitz, Susan G. Orel, Douglas L. Fraker, Linda S. Callans, Mitchell Schnall, Carol Reynolds, Brian J. Czerniecki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a very sensitive technique for detection of breast cancer. We report on MRI-guided needle localization for biopsy of abnormalities seen only on MRI. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 231 patients with invasive breast cancer or ductal carcinoma-in-situ who had MRI as part of their evaluation and treatment at the University of Pennsylvania between 1992 and 1998. Clinical, radiological, and pathologic data were examined. Results: MRI needle localization was performed in 41 (18%) patients. MRI needle localization was required for a finding of a mammographically or clinically occult lesion in 31 patients, better MRI definition of tumor in 5 patients, and surgeon's choice in 5 patients. In all cases, MRI localization and excisional biopsy were successfully completed. Nineteen of 31 patients were found to have additional mammographically and clinically occult tumors. There were 12 (29%) false-positive MRI scans. Conclusions: MRI has a high sensitivity for detection of breast cancer; additional mammographically and clinically occult sites of tumor are detected in approximately 1 (15%) of 7 breast cancer patients. These otherwise occult sites of disease can be appropriately biopsied with MRI needle- localization techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)457-461
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of surgical oncology
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 24 2002

Keywords

  • Biopsy
  • Breast cancer
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Mammography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

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    Bedrosian, I., Schlencker, J., Spitz, F. R., Orel, S. G., Fraker, D. L., Callans, L. S., Schnall, M., Reynolds, C., & Czerniecki, B. J. (2002). Magnetic resonance imaging-guided biopsy of mammographically and clinically occult breast lesions. Annals of surgical oncology, 9(5), 457-461. https://doi.org/10.1245/aso.2002.9.5.457