Moesin-deficient mice reveal a non-redundant role for moesin in lymphocyte homeostasis

Takako Hirata, Akira Nomachi, Kazuo Tohya, Masayuki Miyasaka, Sachiko Tsukita, Takeshi Watanabe, Shuh Narumiya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Moesin is a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family of cytoskeletal proteins. These proteins organize membrane domains by interacting with plasma membrane proteins and the actin cytoskeleton. Because of their high sequence similarity, ERM proteins are usually thought to be functionally redundant. Lymphocytes express two ERM proteins, ezrin and moesin. Whether each ERM plays a specialized role in lymphocytes, particularly in vivo, remains unknown. Here, we show that moesin has a crucial, non-redundant role in lymphocyte homeostasis. Moesin-deficient mice exhibited decreases in both T and B cells in the peripheral blood and lymph nodes, but not in the spleen. This phenotype was recapitulated in bone marrow (BM) chimeras with a hematopoietic moesin deficiency. Although the T and B cells apparently developed without major defects in the moesin-deficient mice, T cell egress from the thymus and immature B cell egress from the BM were impaired. In the periphery, both T and B cells showed delayed egress from lymphoid organs. We showed that moesin is the primary phosphorylated ERM subject to dynamic regulation during cell shape changes and migration. Our findings identify a previously unknown, non-redundant function of moesin in lymphocyte homeostasis in regulating lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)705-717
Number of pages13
JournalInternational immunology
Volume24
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012

Fingerprint

Homeostasis
Lymphocytes
T-Lymphocytes
B-Lymphocytes
moesin
Membrane Proteins
Bone Marrow
B-Lymphoid Precursor Cells
Cytoskeletal Proteins
Cell Shape
Actin Cytoskeleton
Thymus Gland
Cell Movement
ezrin
Blood Proteins
Proteins
Spleen
Lymph Nodes
Cell Membrane
radixin

Keywords

  • Egress
  • Ezrin
  • Migration
  • Radixin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Moesin-deficient mice reveal a non-redundant role for moesin in lymphocyte homeostasis. / Hirata, Takako; Nomachi, Akira; Tohya, Kazuo; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Tsukita, Sachiko; Watanabe, Takeshi; Narumiya, Shuh.

In: International immunology, Vol. 24, No. 11, 01.11.2012, p. 705-717.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hirata, T, Nomachi, A, Tohya, K, Miyasaka, M, Tsukita, S, Watanabe, T & Narumiya, S 2012, 'Moesin-deficient mice reveal a non-redundant role for moesin in lymphocyte homeostasis', International immunology, vol. 24, no. 11, pp. 705-717. https://doi.org/10.1093/intimm/dxs077
Hirata T, Nomachi A, Tohya K, Miyasaka M, Tsukita S, Watanabe T et al. Moesin-deficient mice reveal a non-redundant role for moesin in lymphocyte homeostasis. International immunology. 2012 Nov 1;24(11):705-717. https://doi.org/10.1093/intimm/dxs077
Hirata, Takako ; Nomachi, Akira ; Tohya, Kazuo ; Miyasaka, Masayuki ; Tsukita, Sachiko ; Watanabe, Takeshi ; Narumiya, Shuh. / Moesin-deficient mice reveal a non-redundant role for moesin in lymphocyte homeostasis. In: International immunology. 2012 ; Vol. 24, No. 11. pp. 705-717.
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