Outcome of acute myeloid leukemia and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome according to health insurance status

Ali Al-Ameri, Ankit Anand, Mohamed Abdelfatah, Zeyad Kanaan, Tracy Hammonds, Nairmeen Haller, Mohamad Cherry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

AML and high risk MDS patient outcomes in community hospital setting may vary based on health care insurance status. Ninety four patients were reviewed. Likelihood of survival in patients with Medicaid or Medicare without supplemental insurance was .552 (95% CI, .338-.903; P=.018) times the likelihood in patients who had Medicare with supplemental insurance. Age and risk of mortality were found to be significant predictors of survival whereas insurance did not contribute significantly to the model. Overall survival in the study was inferior as compared to national average. Early referral to a specialized center may improve outcomes.Background: Age, cytogenetic status, andmolecular features are the most important prognostic factors in acutemyeloid leukemia (AML). This study aimed to analyze the outcomes of patients with AML or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) according to insurance status .Patients and Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed, covering all patients with AML and high-risk MDS evaluated and treated at Akron General Medical Center between 2002 and 2012. A Cox regression model was analyzed to account for survival over time, adjusted for insurance type, while controlling for patient age at diagnosis and patient risk of mortality .Results: A total of 130 adult patients (age ≥ 18 years) were identified. Insurance information was available for 97 patients enrolled in the study; 3 were excluded because of self-pay status. Cox regression analysis with insurance type as the predictor found that overall survival declines over time and that the rate of decline may be influenced by insurance type (χ2(2) = 6.4; P = .044). The likelihood of survival in patients with Medicaid or Medicare without supplemental insurance was .552 (95% CI, .338-.903; P = .018) times the likelihood in patients who had Medicare with supplemental insurance. To explain the difference, variables of age, gender, and risk of mortality were added to the model. Age and risk of mortality were found to be significant predictors of survival. The addition of insurance type to the model did not significantly contribute (χ2(3) = 3.83; P = .147) .Conclusion: No significant difference in overall survival was observed when patients with AML or high-risk MDS were analyzed according to their health insurance status. The overall survival was low in this study compared with the national average. Early referral to a specialized center or possible clinical trial enrollment may be a good alternative to improve outcome .

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)509-513
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Lymphoma, Myeloma and Leukemia
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • AML/MDS
  • Cytogenetic data
  • Insurance
  • Outcome
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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