7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To analyze patterns of recurrence and survival and identify prognostic factors in women with neuroendocrine cervical cancer (NECC). Methods We reviewed patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I–IVA NECC who were enrolled in the Neuroendocrine Cervical Tumor Registry and treated with curative intent. Event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) according to disease and treatment characteristics were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Among 40 patients with NECC, 25 (62%) had small cell NECC, eight (20%) had large cell NECC, and seven (18%) had unspecified neuroendocrine histology. With a median follow-up of 21.5 months, 32 patients (80%) experienced progression, and 28 (70%) died. For all patients, the 5-year EFS rate was 20%, and the 5-year OS rate was 27%. Patients with large cell NECC had significantly better median EFS (median not reached vs. 10.0 months, p = 0.02) and showed a trend toward better median OS (153 months vs. 21 months, p = 0.08) than patients with other histologic types. In patients with early-stage clinically node-negative disease, chemoradiation was associated with significantly better median EFS than surgery (median not reached vs. 18.0 months, p = 0.04). Conclusions Patients with large cell NECC have better outcomes than patients with other subtypes of NECC. In early-stage node-negative NECC, chemoradiation yields better EFS than surgery. Most patients with NECC, even those with no evidence of nodal disease at diagnosis, rapidly develop widespread hematogenous metastases and die of their disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)552-557
Number of pages6
JournalGynecologic Oncology
Volume143
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Recurrence
Survival
Neuroendocrine Cells
Disease-Free Survival
Survival Rate
Neuroendocrine Tumors
Gynecology
Obstetrics
Registries
Histology
Neoplasm Metastasis

Keywords

  • Cervical cancer
  • Large cell
  • Neuroendocrine
  • Small cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

@article{932aa91af4a249e9ad0e961d6f24ffcb,
title = "Patterns of recurrence and survival in neuroendocrine cervical cancer",
abstract = "Objective To analyze patterns of recurrence and survival and identify prognostic factors in women with neuroendocrine cervical cancer (NECC). Methods We reviewed patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I–IVA NECC who were enrolled in the Neuroendocrine Cervical Tumor Registry and treated with curative intent. Event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) according to disease and treatment characteristics were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Among 40 patients with NECC, 25 (62{\%}) had small cell NECC, eight (20{\%}) had large cell NECC, and seven (18{\%}) had unspecified neuroendocrine histology. With a median follow-up of 21.5 months, 32 patients (80{\%}) experienced progression, and 28 (70{\%}) died. For all patients, the 5-year EFS rate was 20{\%}, and the 5-year OS rate was 27{\%}. Patients with large cell NECC had significantly better median EFS (median not reached vs. 10.0 months, p = 0.02) and showed a trend toward better median OS (153 months vs. 21 months, p = 0.08) than patients with other histologic types. In patients with early-stage clinically node-negative disease, chemoradiation was associated with significantly better median EFS than surgery (median not reached vs. 18.0 months, p = 0.04). Conclusions Patients with large cell NECC have better outcomes than patients with other subtypes of NECC. In early-stage node-negative NECC, chemoradiation yields better EFS than surgery. Most patients with NECC, even those with no evidence of nodal disease at diagnosis, rapidly develop widespread hematogenous metastases and die of their disease.",
keywords = "Cervical cancer, Large cell, Neuroendocrine, Small cell",
author = "Stecklein, {Shane R.} and Anuja Jhingran and Burzawa, {Jennifer Kelly} and Preetha Ramalingam and Klopp, {Ann H} and Eifel, {Patricia J} and Michael Frumovitz",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ygyno.2016.09.011",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "143",
pages = "552--557",
journal = "Gynecologic Oncology",
issn = "0090-8258",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patterns of recurrence and survival in neuroendocrine cervical cancer

AU - Stecklein, Shane R.

AU - Jhingran, Anuja

AU - Burzawa, Jennifer Kelly

AU - Ramalingam, Preetha

AU - Klopp, Ann H

AU - Eifel, Patricia J

AU - Frumovitz, Michael

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Objective To analyze patterns of recurrence and survival and identify prognostic factors in women with neuroendocrine cervical cancer (NECC). Methods We reviewed patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I–IVA NECC who were enrolled in the Neuroendocrine Cervical Tumor Registry and treated with curative intent. Event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) according to disease and treatment characteristics were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Among 40 patients with NECC, 25 (62%) had small cell NECC, eight (20%) had large cell NECC, and seven (18%) had unspecified neuroendocrine histology. With a median follow-up of 21.5 months, 32 patients (80%) experienced progression, and 28 (70%) died. For all patients, the 5-year EFS rate was 20%, and the 5-year OS rate was 27%. Patients with large cell NECC had significantly better median EFS (median not reached vs. 10.0 months, p = 0.02) and showed a trend toward better median OS (153 months vs. 21 months, p = 0.08) than patients with other histologic types. In patients with early-stage clinically node-negative disease, chemoradiation was associated with significantly better median EFS than surgery (median not reached vs. 18.0 months, p = 0.04). Conclusions Patients with large cell NECC have better outcomes than patients with other subtypes of NECC. In early-stage node-negative NECC, chemoradiation yields better EFS than surgery. Most patients with NECC, even those with no evidence of nodal disease at diagnosis, rapidly develop widespread hematogenous metastases and die of their disease.

AB - Objective To analyze patterns of recurrence and survival and identify prognostic factors in women with neuroendocrine cervical cancer (NECC). Methods We reviewed patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I–IVA NECC who were enrolled in the Neuroendocrine Cervical Tumor Registry and treated with curative intent. Event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) according to disease and treatment characteristics were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Among 40 patients with NECC, 25 (62%) had small cell NECC, eight (20%) had large cell NECC, and seven (18%) had unspecified neuroendocrine histology. With a median follow-up of 21.5 months, 32 patients (80%) experienced progression, and 28 (70%) died. For all patients, the 5-year EFS rate was 20%, and the 5-year OS rate was 27%. Patients with large cell NECC had significantly better median EFS (median not reached vs. 10.0 months, p = 0.02) and showed a trend toward better median OS (153 months vs. 21 months, p = 0.08) than patients with other histologic types. In patients with early-stage clinically node-negative disease, chemoradiation was associated with significantly better median EFS than surgery (median not reached vs. 18.0 months, p = 0.04). Conclusions Patients with large cell NECC have better outcomes than patients with other subtypes of NECC. In early-stage node-negative NECC, chemoradiation yields better EFS than surgery. Most patients with NECC, even those with no evidence of nodal disease at diagnosis, rapidly develop widespread hematogenous metastases and die of their disease.

KW - Cervical cancer

KW - Large cell

KW - Neuroendocrine

KW - Small cell

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U2 - 10.1016/j.ygyno.2016.09.011

DO - 10.1016/j.ygyno.2016.09.011

M3 - Article

C2 - 27645621

AN - SCOPUS:84994756616

VL - 143

SP - 552

EP - 557

JO - Gynecologic Oncology

JF - Gynecologic Oncology

SN - 0090-8258

IS - 3

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