Randomized phase II comparison of dose-intense gemcitabine: Thirty-minute infusion and fixed dose rate infusion in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma

Margaret Tempero, William Plunkett, Veronique Ruiz Van Haperen, John Hainsworth, Howard Hochster, Renato Lenzi, James Abbruzzese

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Abstract

Purpose: To conduct a randomized phase II trial of dose-intense gemcitabine using a standard 30-minute infusion or the fixed dose rate (FDR) infusion (10 mg/m2/min) in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients and Methods: In this prospective trial, patients with locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with 2,200 mg/m2 gemcitabine over 30 minutes (standard arm) or 1,500 mg/m2 gemcitabine over 150 minutes (FDR arm) on days 1, 8, and 15 of every 4-week cycle. The primary end point of this trial was time to treatment failure. Secondary end points included time to progression, median survival, safety, and pharmacokinetic studies of gemcitabine. Results: Ninety-two patients were enrolled onto this study; 91% of the patients had metastatic disease. Time to treatment failure was comparable in both treatment groups; however, the median survival for all patients was 5.0 months in the standard arm and 8.0 months in the FDR arm (P = .013). For patients with metastases, the median survival was 4.9 months in the standard arm and 7.3 months in FDR arm (P = .094). The 1- and 2-year survival rates for all patients were 9% (standard arm) versus 28.8% (FDR; P = .014) and 2.2% (standard arm) versus 18.3% (FDR; P = .007), respectively. Patients in the FDR infusion arm experienced consistently more hematologic toxicity. Pharmacokinetic analyses demonstrated a two-fold increase in intracellular gemcitabine triphosphate concentration in the FDR arm (P = .046). Conclusion: Pharmacokinetic and clinical data in this trial supports the continued evaluation of the FDR infusion strategy with gemcitabine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3402-3408
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume21
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2003

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gemcitabine
Adenocarcinoma
Pharmacokinetics
Treatment Failure
Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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Randomized phase II comparison of dose-intense gemcitabine : Thirty-minute infusion and fixed dose rate infusion in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. / Tempero, Margaret; Plunkett, William; Van Haperen, Veronique Ruiz; Hainsworth, John; Hochster, Howard; Lenzi, Renato; Abbruzzese, James.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 21, No. 18, 15.09.2003, p. 3402-3408.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tempero, Margaret ; Plunkett, William ; Van Haperen, Veronique Ruiz ; Hainsworth, John ; Hochster, Howard ; Lenzi, Renato ; Abbruzzese, James. / Randomized phase II comparison of dose-intense gemcitabine : Thirty-minute infusion and fixed dose rate infusion in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2003 ; Vol. 21, No. 18. pp. 3402-3408.
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abstract = "Purpose: To conduct a randomized phase II trial of dose-intense gemcitabine using a standard 30-minute infusion or the fixed dose rate (FDR) infusion (10 mg/m2/min) in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients and Methods: In this prospective trial, patients with locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with 2,200 mg/m2 gemcitabine over 30 minutes (standard arm) or 1,500 mg/m2 gemcitabine over 150 minutes (FDR arm) on days 1, 8, and 15 of every 4-week cycle. The primary end point of this trial was time to treatment failure. Secondary end points included time to progression, median survival, safety, and pharmacokinetic studies of gemcitabine. Results: Ninety-two patients were enrolled onto this study; 91{\%} of the patients had metastatic disease. Time to treatment failure was comparable in both treatment groups; however, the median survival for all patients was 5.0 months in the standard arm and 8.0 months in the FDR arm (P = .013). For patients with metastases, the median survival was 4.9 months in the standard arm and 7.3 months in FDR arm (P = .094). The 1- and 2-year survival rates for all patients were 9{\%} (standard arm) versus 28.8{\%} (FDR; P = .014) and 2.2{\%} (standard arm) versus 18.3{\%} (FDR; P = .007), respectively. Patients in the FDR infusion arm experienced consistently more hematologic toxicity. Pharmacokinetic analyses demonstrated a two-fold increase in intracellular gemcitabine triphosphate concentration in the FDR arm (P = .046). Conclusion: Pharmacokinetic and clinical data in this trial supports the continued evaluation of the FDR infusion strategy with gemcitabine.",
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AU - Tempero, Margaret

AU - Plunkett, William

AU - Van Haperen, Veronique Ruiz

AU - Hainsworth, John

AU - Hochster, Howard

AU - Lenzi, Renato

AU - Abbruzzese, James

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N2 - Purpose: To conduct a randomized phase II trial of dose-intense gemcitabine using a standard 30-minute infusion or the fixed dose rate (FDR) infusion (10 mg/m2/min) in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients and Methods: In this prospective trial, patients with locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with 2,200 mg/m2 gemcitabine over 30 minutes (standard arm) or 1,500 mg/m2 gemcitabine over 150 minutes (FDR arm) on days 1, 8, and 15 of every 4-week cycle. The primary end point of this trial was time to treatment failure. Secondary end points included time to progression, median survival, safety, and pharmacokinetic studies of gemcitabine. Results: Ninety-two patients were enrolled onto this study; 91% of the patients had metastatic disease. Time to treatment failure was comparable in both treatment groups; however, the median survival for all patients was 5.0 months in the standard arm and 8.0 months in the FDR arm (P = .013). For patients with metastases, the median survival was 4.9 months in the standard arm and 7.3 months in FDR arm (P = .094). The 1- and 2-year survival rates for all patients were 9% (standard arm) versus 28.8% (FDR; P = .014) and 2.2% (standard arm) versus 18.3% (FDR; P = .007), respectively. Patients in the FDR infusion arm experienced consistently more hematologic toxicity. Pharmacokinetic analyses demonstrated a two-fold increase in intracellular gemcitabine triphosphate concentration in the FDR arm (P = .046). Conclusion: Pharmacokinetic and clinical data in this trial supports the continued evaluation of the FDR infusion strategy with gemcitabine.

AB - Purpose: To conduct a randomized phase II trial of dose-intense gemcitabine using a standard 30-minute infusion or the fixed dose rate (FDR) infusion (10 mg/m2/min) in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients and Methods: In this prospective trial, patients with locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with 2,200 mg/m2 gemcitabine over 30 minutes (standard arm) or 1,500 mg/m2 gemcitabine over 150 minutes (FDR arm) on days 1, 8, and 15 of every 4-week cycle. The primary end point of this trial was time to treatment failure. Secondary end points included time to progression, median survival, safety, and pharmacokinetic studies of gemcitabine. Results: Ninety-two patients were enrolled onto this study; 91% of the patients had metastatic disease. Time to treatment failure was comparable in both treatment groups; however, the median survival for all patients was 5.0 months in the standard arm and 8.0 months in the FDR arm (P = .013). For patients with metastases, the median survival was 4.9 months in the standard arm and 7.3 months in FDR arm (P = .094). The 1- and 2-year survival rates for all patients were 9% (standard arm) versus 28.8% (FDR; P = .014) and 2.2% (standard arm) versus 18.3% (FDR; P = .007), respectively. Patients in the FDR infusion arm experienced consistently more hematologic toxicity. Pharmacokinetic analyses demonstrated a two-fold increase in intracellular gemcitabine triphosphate concentration in the FDR arm (P = .046). Conclusion: Pharmacokinetic and clinical data in this trial supports the continued evaluation of the FDR infusion strategy with gemcitabine.

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