Sequential risk of depression in children born prematurely: A nationwide population- based analysis

Ting Fang Chiu, Tung Min Yu, Ya Wen Chuang, Kuo Ting Sun, Chi-Yuan Li, Yuan Chih Su, Chia Hung Kao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Whether children born prematurely are at a high risk of depression is still unknown. The present study examined the risk of depression in children who were born prematurely, by analyzing a national cohort in Taiwan. Methods: All premature births between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2010, by using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 21,478 preterm children and 85,903 full-term children were enrolled in this study. Sex, level of urbanization of residential area, and parental occupation were considered. We included participants who received a diagnosis of depression in more than two clinical visits or were hospitalized due to depression. Results: Preterm children had a 2.75-fold higher risk of depression than full-term children (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.58–4.79, p < 0.001). Sex was not likely to be associated with depression in this study (p = 0.95). The lowest level of urbanization significantly contributed to the risk of depression in preterm children (adjusted hazard ratio = 6.8, 95% CI = 1.63–28.46, p < 0.01). Regarding parental occupation, preterm children whose parents had blue-collar and other occupations had a 3.4- and 6.06-fold higher risk of depression, respectively, compared with other children (blue-collar occupations: 95% CI = 1.04–11.15, p < 0.05; other occupations: 95% CI = 1.71–21.49, p < 0.01). Conclusions: Preterm children had a 2.7-fold higher risk of depression than children born full-term. Early identification, timely psychiatric care, intervention strategies, and support for their families may reduce the complications of mental illness in preterm children.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages42-47
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume243
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2019

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Depression
Population
Occupations
Confidence Intervals
Urbanization
Taiwan
Premature Birth
National Health Programs
Psychiatry
Parents
Databases
Research

Keywords

  • Cumulative risk
  • Depression
  • Low birth weight
  • Prematurity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Sequential risk of depression in children born prematurely : A nationwide population- based analysis. / Chiu, Ting Fang; Yu, Tung Min; Chuang, Ya Wen; Sun, Kuo Ting; Li, Chi-Yuan; Su, Yuan Chih; Kao, Chia Hung.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 243, 15.01.2019, p. 42-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chiu, Ting Fang ; Yu, Tung Min ; Chuang, Ya Wen ; Sun, Kuo Ting ; Li, Chi-Yuan ; Su, Yuan Chih ; Kao, Chia Hung. / Sequential risk of depression in children born prematurely : A nationwide population- based analysis. In: Journal of Affective Disorders. 2019 ; Vol. 243. pp. 42-47.
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abstract = "Background: Whether children born prematurely are at a high risk of depression is still unknown. The present study examined the risk of depression in children who were born prematurely, by analyzing a national cohort in Taiwan. Methods: All premature births between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2010, by using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 21,478 preterm children and 85,903 full-term children were enrolled in this study. Sex, level of urbanization of residential area, and parental occupation were considered. We included participants who received a diagnosis of depression in more than two clinical visits or were hospitalized due to depression. Results: Preterm children had a 2.75-fold higher risk of depression than full-term children (95{\%} confidence interval [CI] = 1.58–4.79, p < 0.001). Sex was not likely to be associated with depression in this study (p = 0.95). The lowest level of urbanization significantly contributed to the risk of depression in preterm children (adjusted hazard ratio = 6.8, 95{\%} CI = 1.63–28.46, p < 0.01). Regarding parental occupation, preterm children whose parents had blue-collar and other occupations had a 3.4- and 6.06-fold higher risk of depression, respectively, compared with other children (blue-collar occupations: 95{\%} CI = 1.04–11.15, p < 0.05; other occupations: 95{\%} CI = 1.71–21.49, p < 0.01). Conclusions: Preterm children had a 2.7-fold higher risk of depression than children born full-term. Early identification, timely psychiatric care, intervention strategies, and support for their families may reduce the complications of mental illness in preterm children.",
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AB - Background: Whether children born prematurely are at a high risk of depression is still unknown. The present study examined the risk of depression in children who were born prematurely, by analyzing a national cohort in Taiwan. Methods: All premature births between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2010, by using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 21,478 preterm children and 85,903 full-term children were enrolled in this study. Sex, level of urbanization of residential area, and parental occupation were considered. We included participants who received a diagnosis of depression in more than two clinical visits or were hospitalized due to depression. Results: Preterm children had a 2.75-fold higher risk of depression than full-term children (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.58–4.79, p < 0.001). Sex was not likely to be associated with depression in this study (p = 0.95). The lowest level of urbanization significantly contributed to the risk of depression in preterm children (adjusted hazard ratio = 6.8, 95% CI = 1.63–28.46, p < 0.01). Regarding parental occupation, preterm children whose parents had blue-collar and other occupations had a 3.4- and 6.06-fold higher risk of depression, respectively, compared with other children (blue-collar occupations: 95% CI = 1.04–11.15, p < 0.05; other occupations: 95% CI = 1.71–21.49, p < 0.01). Conclusions: Preterm children had a 2.7-fold higher risk of depression than children born full-term. Early identification, timely psychiatric care, intervention strategies, and support for their families may reduce the complications of mental illness in preterm children.

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