Structured data collection improves the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

H. Körner, K. Söndenaa, Jon Arne Soreide, E. Andersen, A. Nysted, T. H. Lende

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Structured preoperative data collection and computer-assisted methods are claimed to improve diagnostic accuracy in patients with acute abdominal pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate a possible age- and sex-related effect of using structured data collection in the preoperative diagnosis of patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Methods. Between 1989 and 1994, clinical and demographic data from 1764 consecutive patients were recorded. In 1990 and 1992, various detailed symptom, clinical and laboratory data were collected prospectively on a structured registration form. Age- and sex-specific diagnostic accuracy as well as perforation rate were calculated for each year. Results. Diagnostic accuracy increased significantly by 5 (95 per cent confidence interval (c.i.) 1-9) per cent when structured data registration was applied. In female patients aged between 13 and 40 years, diagnostic accuracy increased by 16 (95 per cent c.i. 8-24) per cent. Significant changes in diagnostic accuracy were not seen in other subgroups. Perforation rates remained unchanged during the entire study period. Conclusion. In this population-based study, diagnostic accuracy in patients operated on for suspected acute appendicitis increased for all patients when structured preoperative data collection was used. However, the only subgroup with a significant increase in diagnostic accuracy was female patients aged between 13 and 40 years. Perforation rate was unaffected by structured data collection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)341-344
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Journal of Surgery
Volume85
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 18 1998

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Appendicitis
Confidence Intervals
Acute Pain
Abdominal Pain
Demography
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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Structured data collection improves the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. / Körner, H.; Söndenaa, K.; Soreide, Jon Arne; Andersen, E.; Nysted, A.; Lende, T. H.

In: British Journal of Surgery, Vol. 85, No. 3, 18.03.1998, p. 341-344.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Körner, H. ; Söndenaa, K. ; Soreide, Jon Arne ; Andersen, E. ; Nysted, A. ; Lende, T. H. / Structured data collection improves the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. In: British Journal of Surgery. 1998 ; Vol. 85, No. 3. pp. 341-344.
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