The future of image-guided radiotherapy will be MR guided

Julianne M. Pollard, Zhifei Wen, Ramaswamy Sadagopan, Jihong Wang, Geoffrey S. Ibbott

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Advances in image-guided radiotherapy (RT) have allowed for dose escalation and more precise radiation treatment delivery. Each decade brings new imaging technologies to help improve RT patient setup. Currently, the most frequently used method of three-dimensional pre-treatment image verification is performed with cone beam CT. However, more recent developments have provided RT with the ability to have on-board MRI coupled to the teleradiotherapy unit. This latest tool for treating cancer is known as MR-guided RT. Several varieties of these units have been designed and installed in centres across the globe. Their prevalence, history, advantages and disadvantages are discussed in this review article. In preparation for the next generation of image-guided RT, this review also covers where MR-guided RT might be heading in the near future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number20160667
JournalBritish Journal of Radiology
Volume90
Issue number1073
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Image-Guided Radiotherapy
Radiotherapy
Cone-Beam Computed Tomography
History
Radiation
Technology
Therapeutics
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

The future of image-guided radiotherapy will be MR guided. / Pollard, Julianne M.; Wen, Zhifei; Sadagopan, Ramaswamy; Wang, Jihong; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

In: British Journal of Radiology, Vol. 90, No. 1073, 20160667, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{54f883367c984acd926cab121ccb3e01,
title = "The future of image-guided radiotherapy will be MR guided",
abstract = "Advances in image-guided radiotherapy (RT) have allowed for dose escalation and more precise radiation treatment delivery. Each decade brings new imaging technologies to help improve RT patient setup. Currently, the most frequently used method of three-dimensional pre-treatment image verification is performed with cone beam CT. However, more recent developments have provided RT with the ability to have on-board MRI coupled to the teleradiotherapy unit. This latest tool for treating cancer is known as MR-guided RT. Several varieties of these units have been designed and installed in centres across the globe. Their prevalence, history, advantages and disadvantages are discussed in this review article. In preparation for the next generation of image-guided RT, this review also covers where MR-guided RT might be heading in the near future.",
author = "Pollard, {Julianne M.} and Zhifei Wen and Ramaswamy Sadagopan and Jihong Wang and Ibbott, {Geoffrey S.}",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1259/bjr.20160667",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "90",
journal = "British Journal of Radiology",
issn = "0007-1285",
publisher = "British Institute of Radiology",
number = "1073",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The future of image-guided radiotherapy will be MR guided

AU - Pollard, Julianne M.

AU - Wen, Zhifei

AU - Sadagopan, Ramaswamy

AU - Wang, Jihong

AU - Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Advances in image-guided radiotherapy (RT) have allowed for dose escalation and more precise radiation treatment delivery. Each decade brings new imaging technologies to help improve RT patient setup. Currently, the most frequently used method of three-dimensional pre-treatment image verification is performed with cone beam CT. However, more recent developments have provided RT with the ability to have on-board MRI coupled to the teleradiotherapy unit. This latest tool for treating cancer is known as MR-guided RT. Several varieties of these units have been designed and installed in centres across the globe. Their prevalence, history, advantages and disadvantages are discussed in this review article. In preparation for the next generation of image-guided RT, this review also covers where MR-guided RT might be heading in the near future.

AB - Advances in image-guided radiotherapy (RT) have allowed for dose escalation and more precise radiation treatment delivery. Each decade brings new imaging technologies to help improve RT patient setup. Currently, the most frequently used method of three-dimensional pre-treatment image verification is performed with cone beam CT. However, more recent developments have provided RT with the ability to have on-board MRI coupled to the teleradiotherapy unit. This latest tool for treating cancer is known as MR-guided RT. Several varieties of these units have been designed and installed in centres across the globe. Their prevalence, history, advantages and disadvantages are discussed in this review article. In preparation for the next generation of image-guided RT, this review also covers where MR-guided RT might be heading in the near future.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85019097381&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85019097381&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1259/bjr.20160667

DO - 10.1259/bjr.20160667

M3 - Review article

C2 - 28256898

AN - SCOPUS:85019097381

VL - 90

JO - British Journal of Radiology

JF - British Journal of Radiology

SN - 0007-1285

IS - 1073

M1 - 20160667

ER -