The Physical Activity for Total Health (PATH) study: Rationale and Design

Anne McTiernan, Cornelia M. Ulrich, Danielle Yancey, Shelley Slate, Heather Nakamura, Nina Oestreicher, Deborah Bowen, Yutaka Yasui, John Potter, Robert Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Physical activity has been associated with a decreased risk for breast cancer. Mechanisms for this association may involve hormonal pathways. The Physical Activity for Total Health study is testing the effect of a 1-yr moderate intensity physical activity intervention on the endogenous sex hormone profile of postmenopausal women in a randomized controlled study. Methods: Women (N = 168) who are aged 55-75 yr, not using sex hormones, sedentary, nonsmokers, have no endocrine-related disease or cancer, and with body mass index of 25.0 or greater, are eligible. Women are recruited through mass mailings and media advertising and are randomized to either a 1-yr moderate intensity aerobic and strength training exercise program (monitored group exercise sessions plus home exercise) or a control program (stretching classes). Results: Serum hormones to be assayed at baseline and at the end of the study include: total estrone, total estradiol, free estradiol, percent bioavailable estradiol, estrone sulfate, sex hormone binding globulin, albumin, testosterone, free testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, insulin, glucose, and triglycerides. Other outcome measures include: the ratio of urinary 2- hydroxyestrone:16α-hydroxyestrin (an estrogen metabolite ratio that may be associated with risk for breast cancer), weight, body mass index, total fat mass, and body fat distribution (waist:hip circumference ratio, DEXA scan, and abdominal fat measured by computed tomography). Conclusion: This study is the first to examine the effect of change in physical activity level on sex hormones in postmenopausal women. It will provide insight into possible mechanisms through which physical activity might be associated with reduced risk of breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1307-1312
Number of pages6
JournalMedicine and science in sports and exercise
Volume31
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Fingerprint

Exercise
Health
Gonadal Steroid Hormones
Breast Neoplasms
Testosterone
Estradiol
Body Mass Index
Endocrine Gland Neoplasms
Body Fat Distribution
Endocrine System Diseases
Abdominal Fat
Mass Media
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin
Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate
Waist-Hip Ratio
Dehydroepiandrosterone
Resistance Training
Androstenedione
Estrone
Photon Absorptiometry

Keywords

  • Androgens
  • Breast cancer
  • Clinical trials
  • Estrogens
  • Exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

The Physical Activity for Total Health (PATH) study : Rationale and Design. / McTiernan, Anne; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Yancey, Danielle; Slate, Shelley; Nakamura, Heather; Oestreicher, Nina; Bowen, Deborah; Yasui, Yutaka; Potter, John; Schwartz, Robert.

In: Medicine and science in sports and exercise, Vol. 31, No. 9, 01.01.1999, p. 1307-1312.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McTiernan, A, Ulrich, CM, Yancey, D, Slate, S, Nakamura, H, Oestreicher, N, Bowen, D, Yasui, Y, Potter, J & Schwartz, R 1999, 'The Physical Activity for Total Health (PATH) study: Rationale and Design', Medicine and science in sports and exercise, vol. 31, no. 9, pp. 1307-1312. https://doi.org/10.1097/00005768-199909000-00012
McTiernan, Anne ; Ulrich, Cornelia M. ; Yancey, Danielle ; Slate, Shelley ; Nakamura, Heather ; Oestreicher, Nina ; Bowen, Deborah ; Yasui, Yutaka ; Potter, John ; Schwartz, Robert. / The Physical Activity for Total Health (PATH) study : Rationale and Design. In: Medicine and science in sports and exercise. 1999 ; Vol. 31, No. 9. pp. 1307-1312.
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