The relationship between UV exposure and incidence of skin cancer

Johan Emelian Moan, Mantas Grigalavicius, Zivile Baturaite, Arne Dahlback, Asta Juzeniene

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary: Background: The incidence rates of skin cancer increase with decreasing latitude in most western countries. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a main risk factor for skin cancer. Methods: We have studied the relationship between UV exposure and skin cancer incidence rates of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and cutaneous melanoma (CM), and tried to fit different mathematical models to the experimental data. Results: The incidence-UV exposure relationship for all three cancers is best described by the power law: ln(RTD)=A b ·ln(annual UV Ery dose), with relative tumor density (RTD) being age-adjusted incidence rate per unit area of skin, and the power parameter A b being the biological amplification factor. For SCC, the RTD is a factor of 16-19 times larger on the head than on the trunk. For BCC, this factor is 7 and for CM it is 0.9-1.3. A b for CM has remained almost unchanged from the 1960s until recently. Conclusions: The incidence-sun exposure relationship for all three cancers is well described by the power law. SCC is dependent on total UV exposures, while BCC, and even more CM, is dependent also on exposure patterns, with intermittent exposures being most carcinogenic. Copyright

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-35
Number of pages10
JournalPhotodermatology Photoimmunology and Photomedicine
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Skin Neoplasms
Specific Gravity
Melanoma
Basal Cell Carcinoma
Skin
Incidence
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Neoplasms
Biological Factors
Solar System
Theoretical Models
Head
Radiation

Keywords

  • Basal cell carcinoma
  • Cutaneous melanoma
  • Skin cancer
  • Squamous cell carcinoma
  • Ultraviolet radiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Dermatology

Cite this

The relationship between UV exposure and incidence of skin cancer. / Moan, Johan Emelian; Grigalavicius, Mantas; Baturaite, Zivile; Dahlback, Arne; Juzeniene, Asta.

In: Photodermatology Photoimmunology and Photomedicine, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 26-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moan, Johan Emelian ; Grigalavicius, Mantas ; Baturaite, Zivile ; Dahlback, Arne ; Juzeniene, Asta. / The relationship between UV exposure and incidence of skin cancer. In: Photodermatology Photoimmunology and Photomedicine. 2015 ; Vol. 31, No. 1. pp. 26-35.
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