Treatment efficacy for human papillomavirus-related anal squamous cell dysplasia in an under-represented population: human immunodeficiency-negative, non-men having sex with men, and non-transplant population

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Abstract

Aim: Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related anal squamous cell dysplasia has been well-reported in high-risk (HR) patients [human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive, men having sex with men (MSM) or immune-suppressed transplant recipients]. However, data are extremely limited for all other patients. This study reports treatment outcomes for HPV-related dysplasia in a population of non-HR patients. Method: A retrospective study was performed to review treatment efficacy in non-HR patients diagnosed with anal dysplasia or superficially invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the anus (SISCCA) with at least 12-months’ follow-up; HR patients were excluded. Medical records were reviewed for demographics, pathology, cytopathology, treatment and recurrences. Results: Forty-one patients were identified (34 women). The median age at diagnosis was 58 years (range 26–85) and median follow-up was 26 months (range 12–51). At diagnosis, 36 patients had anal dysplasia and five patients had SISCCA. Treatment outcomes (resolved versus recurrent) differed between treatment modalities (P = 0.014). Topical and fulguration-only treatment modalities were superior to wide local excision (WLE) (P < 0.006 and P < 0.008, respectively). Fourteen (39%) patients had recurrent dysplasia at a median of 14 months (range 4–62); eight patients developed a second recurrence at a median of 14 months (range 11–26). No SISCCA patient had a recurrence, but two patients progressed to anal cancer after treatment. Conclusion: The behaviour of anal dysplasia reported in this under-represented, small group of non-HR patients reveals that treatment for anal dysplasia is not necessarily a single event and nonexcisional treatments may be favourable to WLE. Though the true denominator of this population is unknown, treatment may not prevent the recurrence of dysplasia or progression to cancer, warranting close follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalColorectal Disease
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Epithelial Cells
Population
Anal Canal
Recurrence
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Therapeutics
Anus Neoplasms
Medical Records
Retrospective Studies
Demography
HIV
Pathology

Keywords

  • anal dysplasia
  • human papillomavirus
  • treatment outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

@article{2dcb6fde5eb145c8b7515ded41179de8,
title = "Treatment efficacy for human papillomavirus-related anal squamous cell dysplasia in an under-represented population: human immunodeficiency-negative, non-men having sex with men, and non-transplant population",
abstract = "Aim: Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related anal squamous cell dysplasia has been well-reported in high-risk (HR) patients [human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive, men having sex with men (MSM) or immune-suppressed transplant recipients]. However, data are extremely limited for all other patients. This study reports treatment outcomes for HPV-related dysplasia in a population of non-HR patients. Method: A retrospective study was performed to review treatment efficacy in non-HR patients diagnosed with anal dysplasia or superficially invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the anus (SISCCA) with at least 12-months’ follow-up; HR patients were excluded. Medical records were reviewed for demographics, pathology, cytopathology, treatment and recurrences. Results: Forty-one patients were identified (34 women). The median age at diagnosis was 58 years (range 26–85) and median follow-up was 26 months (range 12–51). At diagnosis, 36 patients had anal dysplasia and five patients had SISCCA. Treatment outcomes (resolved versus recurrent) differed between treatment modalities (P = 0.014). Topical and fulguration-only treatment modalities were superior to wide local excision (WLE) (P < 0.006 and P < 0.008, respectively). Fourteen (39{\%}) patients had recurrent dysplasia at a median of 14 months (range 4–62); eight patients developed a second recurrence at a median of 14 months (range 11–26). No SISCCA patient had a recurrence, but two patients progressed to anal cancer after treatment. Conclusion: The behaviour of anal dysplasia reported in this under-represented, small group of non-HR patients reveals that treatment for anal dysplasia is not necessarily a single event and nonexcisional treatments may be favourable to WLE. Though the true denominator of this population is unknown, treatment may not prevent the recurrence of dysplasia or progression to cancer, warranting close follow-up.",
keywords = "anal dysplasia, human papillomavirus, treatment outcomes",
author = "Craig Messick",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/codi.14786",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Colorectal Disease",
issn = "1462-8910",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

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T1 - Treatment efficacy for human papillomavirus-related anal squamous cell dysplasia in an under-represented population

T2 - human immunodeficiency-negative, non-men having sex with men, and non-transplant population

AU - Messick, Craig

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Aim: Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related anal squamous cell dysplasia has been well-reported in high-risk (HR) patients [human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive, men having sex with men (MSM) or immune-suppressed transplant recipients]. However, data are extremely limited for all other patients. This study reports treatment outcomes for HPV-related dysplasia in a population of non-HR patients. Method: A retrospective study was performed to review treatment efficacy in non-HR patients diagnosed with anal dysplasia or superficially invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the anus (SISCCA) with at least 12-months’ follow-up; HR patients were excluded. Medical records were reviewed for demographics, pathology, cytopathology, treatment and recurrences. Results: Forty-one patients were identified (34 women). The median age at diagnosis was 58 years (range 26–85) and median follow-up was 26 months (range 12–51). At diagnosis, 36 patients had anal dysplasia and five patients had SISCCA. Treatment outcomes (resolved versus recurrent) differed between treatment modalities (P = 0.014). Topical and fulguration-only treatment modalities were superior to wide local excision (WLE) (P < 0.006 and P < 0.008, respectively). Fourteen (39%) patients had recurrent dysplasia at a median of 14 months (range 4–62); eight patients developed a second recurrence at a median of 14 months (range 11–26). No SISCCA patient had a recurrence, but two patients progressed to anal cancer after treatment. Conclusion: The behaviour of anal dysplasia reported in this under-represented, small group of non-HR patients reveals that treatment for anal dysplasia is not necessarily a single event and nonexcisional treatments may be favourable to WLE. Though the true denominator of this population is unknown, treatment may not prevent the recurrence of dysplasia or progression to cancer, warranting close follow-up.

AB - Aim: Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related anal squamous cell dysplasia has been well-reported in high-risk (HR) patients [human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive, men having sex with men (MSM) or immune-suppressed transplant recipients]. However, data are extremely limited for all other patients. This study reports treatment outcomes for HPV-related dysplasia in a population of non-HR patients. Method: A retrospective study was performed to review treatment efficacy in non-HR patients diagnosed with anal dysplasia or superficially invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the anus (SISCCA) with at least 12-months’ follow-up; HR patients were excluded. Medical records were reviewed for demographics, pathology, cytopathology, treatment and recurrences. Results: Forty-one patients were identified (34 women). The median age at diagnosis was 58 years (range 26–85) and median follow-up was 26 months (range 12–51). At diagnosis, 36 patients had anal dysplasia and five patients had SISCCA. Treatment outcomes (resolved versus recurrent) differed between treatment modalities (P = 0.014). Topical and fulguration-only treatment modalities were superior to wide local excision (WLE) (P < 0.006 and P < 0.008, respectively). Fourteen (39%) patients had recurrent dysplasia at a median of 14 months (range 4–62); eight patients developed a second recurrence at a median of 14 months (range 11–26). No SISCCA patient had a recurrence, but two patients progressed to anal cancer after treatment. Conclusion: The behaviour of anal dysplasia reported in this under-represented, small group of non-HR patients reveals that treatment for anal dysplasia is not necessarily a single event and nonexcisional treatments may be favourable to WLE. Though the true denominator of this population is unknown, treatment may not prevent the recurrence of dysplasia or progression to cancer, warranting close follow-up.

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KW - human papillomavirus

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