Treatment regret and quality of life following radical prostatectomy

Chelsea G. Ratcliff, Lorenzo Cohen, Curtis A. Pettaway, Patricia A. Parker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Negative physical functioning outcomes including incontinence and erectile dysfunction are relatively common following radical prostatectomy (RP) and are associated with treatment regret and compromised quality of life (QOL). The role that treatment regret may have in influencing the association between prostate-specific QOL (i.e., sexual, urinary, bowl functioning) and general QOL following RP has not been examined. Method: This study examined the associations of treatment regret, general QOL (36-item Short Form Health Survey physical and mental health (MCS) composite scores), and prostate-specific QOL (Prostate Cancer QOL sexual, urinary, bowl functioning, and cancer worry subscales) in 95 men who underwent RP for prostate cancer. Results: Multiple regression analyses indicated that poorer sexual and urinary functioning was associated with poorer MCS. Additionally, men with lower sexual and urinary functioning reported greater treatment regret. Treatment regret was also associated with lower MCS. Finally, treatment regret partially mediated the effects of both sexual and urinary functioning on MCS. Conclusions: These findings suggest that regardless of a patient's prostate-specific QOL, reducing treatment regret may improve mental health following RP. Though there are limited options to alter patients' sexual or urinary functioning following RP, treatment regret may be a modifiable contributor to post-surgical adjustment and QOL.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3337-3343
Number of pages7
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume21
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013

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Prostatectomy
Emotions
Quality of Life
Prostate
Therapeutics
Prostatic Neoplasms
Mental Health
Social Adjustment
Erectile Dysfunction
Health Surveys
Regression Analysis
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Prostate cancer
  • Psychosocial adjustment
  • QOL
  • Treatment regret

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Treatment regret and quality of life following radical prostatectomy. / Ratcliff, Chelsea G.; Cohen, Lorenzo; Pettaway, Curtis A.; Parker, Patricia A.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, Vol. 21, No. 12, 01.12.2013, p. 3337-3343.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ratcliff, Chelsea G. ; Cohen, Lorenzo ; Pettaway, Curtis A. ; Parker, Patricia A. / Treatment regret and quality of life following radical prostatectomy. In: Supportive Care in Cancer. 2013 ; Vol. 21, No. 12. pp. 3337-3343.
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