Colonization and infection with vancomycin-resistant enterococcus among patients with cancer

Madonna J. Matar, Jeffrey J Tarrand, Issam I Raad, Kenneth V.I. Rolston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) cause substantial morbidity and mortality in immune-suppressed patients. In a retrospective review, VRE fecal colonization was documented in 4.7% (99 of 2115) of patients screened, with 5.4% of patients with leukemia, 4.9% of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients, and 2.2% of patients with lymphoma being colonized. Among the 99 patients with VRE colonization, 29 (29.29%) developed bacteremia, and there were 32 episodes of VRE infection at other sites. The rate of VRE bacteremia in solid tumor patients (0.12%) was significantly lower (P ≤ .0001). VRE colonization had a negative predictive value of 99.9% and a positive predictive value of 29.3% for the development of VRE bacteremia and might help identify a high-risk subset of patients that might benefit from preemptive VRE therapy during episodes of neutropenic fever.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)534-536
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume34
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006

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Infection
Neoplasms
Bacteremia
Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Lymphoma
Leukemia
Fever
Morbidity
Mortality
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Colonization and infection with vancomycin-resistant enterococcus among patients with cancer. / Matar, Madonna J.; Tarrand, Jeffrey J; Raad, Issam I; Rolston, Kenneth V.I.

In: American Journal of Infection Control, Vol. 34, No. 8, 01.10.2006, p. 534-536.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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