Couples’ symptom burden in oncology care: perception of self and the other

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The literature suggests that psychological distress and quality of life are interdependent in couples coping with cancer. The current study seeks to extend these findings to physical symptom burden, examining differences in symptom self-rating and perception of partner symptoms. Methods: Couples were approached while waiting for an integrative oncology service. Fifty patients and their partners completed the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS-FS; twelve symptoms, scores 0–10, 10 worst possible) and a Global Health measure (PROMIS10). Patient and partner each also completed the ESAS-FS as it related to their perception of the other’s symptoms. ESAS distress subscales analyzed included Global (GDS), Psychosocial (PSS), and Physical (PHS). Analyses included paired t tests to examine all measures. Results: Fifty-eight percent of patients were female with most common cancer diagnoses of breast (22%), gastrointestinal (16%), and thoracic/H&N (16%). For ESAS-FS self-ratings, patients had significantly higher physical distress than partners, with a no significant difference in psychosocial distress. For PROMIS10 self-ratings, patients reported significantly lower global health and physical health, (p’s < 0.001); no differences were found for mental health between patients and caregivers. Patient rating of partner physical distress (PHS, p = 0.01) was significantly higher than partner self-rating, with no significant difference observed in ratings for psychosocial distress. Partner rating of patient psychosocial distress (PSS, p < 0.001) and physical distress (PHS, p = 0.001) was significantly higher than that of patient self-rating. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that both patients and partners perceive physical distress of the other higher than self; however, patients may be more sensitive to psychosocial distress in their partners.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages139-145
Number of pages7
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Self Care
Symptom Assessment
Caregivers
Mental Health
Thorax
Quality of Life
Breast Neoplasms
Psychology

Keywords

  • Caregiver
  • Couple communication
  • Edmonton Symptom Assessment System
  • Integrative oncology
  • Patient reported outcomes
  • Symptom burden

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

@article{2e3ba406205c4967a7b8725e8c16f0ad,
title = "Couples’ symptom burden in oncology care: perception of self and the other",
abstract = "Background: The literature suggests that psychological distress and quality of life are interdependent in couples coping with cancer. The current study seeks to extend these findings to physical symptom burden, examining differences in symptom self-rating and perception of partner symptoms. Methods: Couples were approached while waiting for an integrative oncology service. Fifty patients and their partners completed the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS-FS; twelve symptoms, scores 0–10, 10 worst possible) and a Global Health measure (PROMIS10). Patient and partner each also completed the ESAS-FS as it related to their perception of the other’s symptoms. ESAS distress subscales analyzed included Global (GDS), Psychosocial (PSS), and Physical (PHS). Analyses included paired t tests to examine all measures. Results: Fifty-eight percent of patients were female with most common cancer diagnoses of breast (22{\%}), gastrointestinal (16{\%}), and thoracic/H&N (16{\%}). For ESAS-FS self-ratings, patients had significantly higher physical distress than partners, with a no significant difference in psychosocial distress. For PROMIS10 self-ratings, patients reported significantly lower global health and physical health, (p’s < 0.001); no differences were found for mental health between patients and caregivers. Patient rating of partner physical distress (PHS, p = 0.01) was significantly higher than partner self-rating, with no significant difference observed in ratings for psychosocial distress. Partner rating of patient psychosocial distress (PSS, p < 0.001) and physical distress (PHS, p = 0.001) was significantly higher than that of patient self-rating. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that both patients and partners perceive physical distress of the other higher than self; however, patients may be more sensitive to psychosocial distress in their partners.",
keywords = "Caregiver, Couple communication, Edmonton Symptom Assessment System, Integrative oncology, Patient reported outcomes, Symptom burden",
author = "Gabriel Lopez and Kathrin Milbury and Minxing Chen and Yisheng Li and Eduardo Bruera and Lorenzo Cohen",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00520-018-4298-7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "27",
pages = "139--145",
journal = "Supportive Care in Cancer",
issn = "0941-4355",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Couples’ symptom burden in oncology care

T2 - Supportive Care in Cancer

AU - Lopez, Gabriel

AU - Milbury, Kathrin

AU - Chen, Minxing

AU - Li, Yisheng

AU - Bruera, Eduardo

AU - Cohen, Lorenzo

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: The literature suggests that psychological distress and quality of life are interdependent in couples coping with cancer. The current study seeks to extend these findings to physical symptom burden, examining differences in symptom self-rating and perception of partner symptoms. Methods: Couples were approached while waiting for an integrative oncology service. Fifty patients and their partners completed the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS-FS; twelve symptoms, scores 0–10, 10 worst possible) and a Global Health measure (PROMIS10). Patient and partner each also completed the ESAS-FS as it related to their perception of the other’s symptoms. ESAS distress subscales analyzed included Global (GDS), Psychosocial (PSS), and Physical (PHS). Analyses included paired t tests to examine all measures. Results: Fifty-eight percent of patients were female with most common cancer diagnoses of breast (22%), gastrointestinal (16%), and thoracic/H&N (16%). For ESAS-FS self-ratings, patients had significantly higher physical distress than partners, with a no significant difference in psychosocial distress. For PROMIS10 self-ratings, patients reported significantly lower global health and physical health, (p’s < 0.001); no differences were found for mental health between patients and caregivers. Patient rating of partner physical distress (PHS, p = 0.01) was significantly higher than partner self-rating, with no significant difference observed in ratings for psychosocial distress. Partner rating of patient psychosocial distress (PSS, p < 0.001) and physical distress (PHS, p = 0.001) was significantly higher than that of patient self-rating. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that both patients and partners perceive physical distress of the other higher than self; however, patients may be more sensitive to psychosocial distress in their partners.

AB - Background: The literature suggests that psychological distress and quality of life are interdependent in couples coping with cancer. The current study seeks to extend these findings to physical symptom burden, examining differences in symptom self-rating and perception of partner symptoms. Methods: Couples were approached while waiting for an integrative oncology service. Fifty patients and their partners completed the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS-FS; twelve symptoms, scores 0–10, 10 worst possible) and a Global Health measure (PROMIS10). Patient and partner each also completed the ESAS-FS as it related to their perception of the other’s symptoms. ESAS distress subscales analyzed included Global (GDS), Psychosocial (PSS), and Physical (PHS). Analyses included paired t tests to examine all measures. Results: Fifty-eight percent of patients were female with most common cancer diagnoses of breast (22%), gastrointestinal (16%), and thoracic/H&N (16%). For ESAS-FS self-ratings, patients had significantly higher physical distress than partners, with a no significant difference in psychosocial distress. For PROMIS10 self-ratings, patients reported significantly lower global health and physical health, (p’s < 0.001); no differences were found for mental health between patients and caregivers. Patient rating of partner physical distress (PHS, p = 0.01) was significantly higher than partner self-rating, with no significant difference observed in ratings for psychosocial distress. Partner rating of patient psychosocial distress (PSS, p < 0.001) and physical distress (PHS, p = 0.001) was significantly higher than that of patient self-rating. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that both patients and partners perceive physical distress of the other higher than self; however, patients may be more sensitive to psychosocial distress in their partners.

KW - Caregiver

KW - Couple communication

KW - Edmonton Symptom Assessment System

KW - Integrative oncology

KW - Patient reported outcomes

KW - Symptom burden

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85048271953&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85048271953&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00520-018-4298-7

DO - 10.1007/s00520-018-4298-7

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 139

EP - 145

JO - Supportive Care in Cancer

JF - Supportive Care in Cancer

SN - 0941-4355

IS - 1

ER -