Further experience with Botox injection for tracheoesophageal speech failure

Jan S. Lewin, Julie K. Bishop-Leone, Arthur D. Forman, Eduardo M. Diaz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Some patients fail to acquire tracheoesophageal (TE) speech after laryngectomy because of pharyngeal constrictor hypertonicity. Botox injection relieves hypertonicity, but there are little objective data regarding outcomes, duration of effect, and reinjection rates. Methods. Hypertonicity was identified by means of insufflation testing and confirmed videofluoroscopically in 23 unsuccessful TE speakers. Each patient received an EMG-guided Botox injection. Additional injections were offered if the first injection failed to produce fluent speech. Results. Overall, 20 of 23 patients (87%) achieved fluent TE speech production after Botox injections; 5 after additional injections. Two patients declined further intervention, and 1 failed to achieve fluent TE speech production even after 3 Botox injections. The longest sustained effect was 37 months, the shortest was 5 months for 1 patient who required reinjection of Botox to maintain her TE speech production. Conclusions. Botox injection relieves constrictor hypertonicity in selected cases of TE speech failure with little need for reinjection to maintain long-term speech success.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)456-460
Number of pages5
JournalHead and Neck
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 11 2001

Fingerprint

Injections
Insufflation
Laryngectomy
onabotulinumtoxinA

Keywords

  • Botulinum toxin
  • Laryngectomy
  • Pharyngoesophageal (PE) spasm
  • Tracheoesophageal puncture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Further experience with Botox injection for tracheoesophageal speech failure. / Lewin, Jan S.; Bishop-Leone, Julie K.; Forman, Arthur D.; Diaz, Eduardo M.

In: Head and Neck, Vol. 23, No. 6, 11.06.2001, p. 456-460.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lewin, Jan S. ; Bishop-Leone, Julie K. ; Forman, Arthur D. ; Diaz, Eduardo M. / Further experience with Botox injection for tracheoesophageal speech failure. In: Head and Neck. 2001 ; Vol. 23, No. 6. pp. 456-460.
@article{6633dbb24f41413ebabd869af160f4b1,
title = "Further experience with Botox injection for tracheoesophageal speech failure",
abstract = "Background. Some patients fail to acquire tracheoesophageal (TE) speech after laryngectomy because of pharyngeal constrictor hypertonicity. Botox injection relieves hypertonicity, but there are little objective data regarding outcomes, duration of effect, and reinjection rates. Methods. Hypertonicity was identified by means of insufflation testing and confirmed videofluoroscopically in 23 unsuccessful TE speakers. Each patient received an EMG-guided Botox injection. Additional injections were offered if the first injection failed to produce fluent speech. Results. Overall, 20 of 23 patients (87{\%}) achieved fluent TE speech production after Botox injections; 5 after additional injections. Two patients declined further intervention, and 1 failed to achieve fluent TE speech production even after 3 Botox injections. The longest sustained effect was 37 months, the shortest was 5 months for 1 patient who required reinjection of Botox to maintain her TE speech production. Conclusions. Botox injection relieves constrictor hypertonicity in selected cases of TE speech failure with little need for reinjection to maintain long-term speech success.",
keywords = "Botulinum toxin, Laryngectomy, Pharyngoesophageal (PE) spasm, Tracheoesophageal puncture",
author = "Lewin, {Jan S.} and Bishop-Leone, {Julie K.} and Forman, {Arthur D.} and Diaz, {Eduardo M.}",
year = "2001",
month = "6",
day = "11",
doi = "10.1002/hed.1059",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "456--460",
journal = "Head and Neck",
issn = "1043-3074",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Further experience with Botox injection for tracheoesophageal speech failure

AU - Lewin, Jan S.

AU - Bishop-Leone, Julie K.

AU - Forman, Arthur D.

AU - Diaz, Eduardo M.

PY - 2001/6/11

Y1 - 2001/6/11

N2 - Background. Some patients fail to acquire tracheoesophageal (TE) speech after laryngectomy because of pharyngeal constrictor hypertonicity. Botox injection relieves hypertonicity, but there are little objective data regarding outcomes, duration of effect, and reinjection rates. Methods. Hypertonicity was identified by means of insufflation testing and confirmed videofluoroscopically in 23 unsuccessful TE speakers. Each patient received an EMG-guided Botox injection. Additional injections were offered if the first injection failed to produce fluent speech. Results. Overall, 20 of 23 patients (87%) achieved fluent TE speech production after Botox injections; 5 after additional injections. Two patients declined further intervention, and 1 failed to achieve fluent TE speech production even after 3 Botox injections. The longest sustained effect was 37 months, the shortest was 5 months for 1 patient who required reinjection of Botox to maintain her TE speech production. Conclusions. Botox injection relieves constrictor hypertonicity in selected cases of TE speech failure with little need for reinjection to maintain long-term speech success.

AB - Background. Some patients fail to acquire tracheoesophageal (TE) speech after laryngectomy because of pharyngeal constrictor hypertonicity. Botox injection relieves hypertonicity, but there are little objective data regarding outcomes, duration of effect, and reinjection rates. Methods. Hypertonicity was identified by means of insufflation testing and confirmed videofluoroscopically in 23 unsuccessful TE speakers. Each patient received an EMG-guided Botox injection. Additional injections were offered if the first injection failed to produce fluent speech. Results. Overall, 20 of 23 patients (87%) achieved fluent TE speech production after Botox injections; 5 after additional injections. Two patients declined further intervention, and 1 failed to achieve fluent TE speech production even after 3 Botox injections. The longest sustained effect was 37 months, the shortest was 5 months for 1 patient who required reinjection of Botox to maintain her TE speech production. Conclusions. Botox injection relieves constrictor hypertonicity in selected cases of TE speech failure with little need for reinjection to maintain long-term speech success.

KW - Botulinum toxin

KW - Laryngectomy

KW - Pharyngoesophageal (PE) spasm

KW - Tracheoesophageal puncture

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035017433&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035017433&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/hed.1059

DO - 10.1002/hed.1059

M3 - Article

C2 - 11360306

AN - SCOPUS:0035017433

VL - 23

SP - 456

EP - 460

JO - Head and Neck

JF - Head and Neck

SN - 1043-3074

IS - 6

ER -