Laryngeal stenosis after supracricoid partial laryngectomy

Eduardo M Diaz Jr, Laurent Laccourreye, David Veivers, Dominique Garcia, Daniel Brasnu, Ollivier Laccourreye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to review the incidence, risks, management, and outcomes of nontumoral laryngeal stenosis after supracricoid partial laryngectomy (SCPL) in a case series of 376 consecutive SCPLs performed at 1 institution from 1975 to 1995 with a minimum of 3 years of follow-up. Post-SCPL nontumoral symptomatic laryngeal stenosis was defined as an inability to decannulate patients before the 60th postoperative day (group 1) or the development of dyspnea (in patients without local recurrence) after an initial period of prolonged, successful decannulation (group 2). Of 376 SCPLs performed, nontumoral symptomatic laryngeal stenosis developed in 14 (3.7%). There were 7 patients (1.85%) in group 1 and 7 patients (1.85%) in group 2. In univariate analysis, none of the following variables appeared to be statistically related to the risk of immediate stenosis (group 1): age, gender, comorbidity, diabetes mellitus, symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux, arteritis, preoperative radiotherapy, arytenoid cartilage disarticulation, type of reconstruction performed, and postoperative radiotherapy. A delayed laryngeal stenosis (group 2) was statistically more likely to occur if the reconstruction performed at the time of SCPL was a cricohyoidopexy (p =. 01). Successful management of the laryngeal stenosis without permanent tracheostomy was achieved in 5 group 1 patients and 3 group 2 patients. We believe that stenosis in group 1 patients arose through technical error, whereas group 2 patients seemed to suffer from problems of healing, mainly cicatricial narrowing of the airway at the site of the cricohyoidal impaction, or pexis. As a result, whereas laryngeal stenosis in group 1 patients was usually more easily correctable through dilation, laser incision, or resection of redundant tissue or revision of the impaction, laryngeal stenosis in group 2 patients presented a more difficult and frustrating complication. The management and outcomes of these patients are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1077-1081
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology
Volume109
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

Fingerprint

Laryngostenosis
Laryngectomy
Pathologic Constriction
Radiotherapy
Arytenoid Cartilage
Disarticulation
Arteritis
Tracheostomy
Risk Management
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Dyspnea
Comorbidity
Dilatation
Diabetes Mellitus

Keywords

  • Complications
  • Laryngeal stenosis
  • Supracricoid partial laryngectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Diaz Jr, E. M., Laccourreye, L., Veivers, D., Garcia, D., Brasnu, D., & Laccourreye, O. (2000). Laryngeal stenosis after supracricoid partial laryngectomy. Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology, 109(11), 1077-1081. https://doi.org/10.1177/000348940010901115

Laryngeal stenosis after supracricoid partial laryngectomy. / Diaz Jr, Eduardo M; Laccourreye, Laurent; Veivers, David; Garcia, Dominique; Brasnu, Daniel; Laccourreye, Ollivier.

In: Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology, Vol. 109, No. 11, 01.01.2000, p. 1077-1081.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Diaz Jr, EM, Laccourreye, L, Veivers, D, Garcia, D, Brasnu, D & Laccourreye, O 2000, 'Laryngeal stenosis after supracricoid partial laryngectomy', Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology, vol. 109, no. 11, pp. 1077-1081. https://doi.org/10.1177/000348940010901115
Diaz Jr, Eduardo M ; Laccourreye, Laurent ; Veivers, David ; Garcia, Dominique ; Brasnu, Daniel ; Laccourreye, Ollivier. / Laryngeal stenosis after supracricoid partial laryngectomy. In: Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology. 2000 ; Vol. 109, No. 11. pp. 1077-1081.
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