Manipulating the p53 gene in the mouse: Organismal functions of a prototype tumor suppressor

Lawrence A. Donehower, Dora Bocangel, Melissa Dumble, Guillermina Lozano

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The early discoveries elucidating p53 function were based on cell culture experiments. Most of our fundamental knowledge of the role of p53 in cell signaling, stress response, cell cycle control, and apoptosis are a result of these in vitro studies (Giaccia and Kastan, 1998; Ko and Prives, 1996; Levine, 1997; Vogelstein et al., 2000). However, a greater depth of understanding was facilitated by the advent first of transgenic mouse methodologies and then by embryonic stem (ES) cell-based genetic manipulations. The sequencing of the mouse genome (www.ensembl.org and www.myscience.appliedbiosystems.com) has greatly simplified and accelerated the generation of null alleles. Methods have been developed to generate single nucleotide substitutions in the germline of mice, and importantly, to generate somatic mutations in genes to study somatic inactivation as occurs in most human cancers. The availability of whole genome analysis at the RNA expression level (arrays) and at the genomic level (array CGH) provides another level of analysis that is sure to provide insights into the molecular changes that lead to the initiation, progression, and maintenance of the tumor phenotype.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication25 Years of p53 Research
PublisherSpringer Netherlands
Pages183-207
Number of pages25
ISBN (Electronic)9781402029226
ISBN (Print)9781402029202
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

p53 Genes
Genome
Embryonic Stem Cells
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Transgenic Mice
Neoplasms
Nucleotides
Cell Culture Techniques
Alleles
Maintenance
RNA
Apoptosis
Phenotype
Mutation
Genes
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Donehower, L. A., Bocangel, D., Dumble, M., & Lozano, G. (2005). Manipulating the p53 gene in the mouse: Organismal functions of a prototype tumor suppressor. In 25 Years of p53 Research (pp. 183-207). Springer Netherlands. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-2922-6_8

Manipulating the p53 gene in the mouse : Organismal functions of a prototype tumor suppressor. / Donehower, Lawrence A.; Bocangel, Dora; Dumble, Melissa; Lozano, Guillermina.

25 Years of p53 Research. Springer Netherlands, 2005. p. 183-207.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Donehower, LA, Bocangel, D, Dumble, M & Lozano, G 2005, Manipulating the p53 gene in the mouse: Organismal functions of a prototype tumor suppressor. in 25 Years of p53 Research. Springer Netherlands, pp. 183-207. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-2922-6_8
Donehower LA, Bocangel D, Dumble M, Lozano G. Manipulating the p53 gene in the mouse: Organismal functions of a prototype tumor suppressor. In 25 Years of p53 Research. Springer Netherlands. 2005. p. 183-207 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-2922-6_8
Donehower, Lawrence A. ; Bocangel, Dora ; Dumble, Melissa ; Lozano, Guillermina. / Manipulating the p53 gene in the mouse : Organismal functions of a prototype tumor suppressor. 25 Years of p53 Research. Springer Netherlands, 2005. pp. 183-207
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