Survival benefit associated with surgical oophorectomy in patients with colorectal cancer metastatic to the ovary

Christopher Garrett, Ben George, Chitra Viswanathan, Nishin A. Bhadkamkar, Sijin Wen, Veerarabhadran Baladandayuthapani, Y. Nancy You, Edmund S. Kopetz, Michael J. Overman, Bryan K. Kee, Cathy Eng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the outcome of patients with colorectal cancer metastatic to the ovary and the impact of surgical oophorectomy on the outcome. We conducted a retrospective evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer to the ovary. Of 3776 female patients with colorectal cancer seen at MD Anderson from 2001-2008, 110 (2.9%) were identified as having metastases to the ovary. The Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used to examine the survival functions. Seventy-one patients (64.5%) had disease metastatic to the ovary at the time of initial presentation; in 39 patients (35.5%) the ovaries were a site of relapse after previous curative colorectal surgical resection. Patients who presented with ovarian relapse after previous colorectal surgery and who underwent oophorectomy had a median survival of 50 months compared with 12 months for those who did not (P < .0001). Patients with metastatic disease at the time of presentation who underwent oophorectomy had a median survival of 39.4 months vs. 18.2 months for those who did not. This retrospective analysis suggests that women with metastatic colorectal cancer metastatic to the ovary may derive a survival benefit from palliative oophorectomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-194
Number of pages4
JournalClinical colorectal cancer
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer
  • Metastasis
  • Oophorectomy
  • Ovary

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Gastroenterology

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