The association between psychosocial and medical factors with long-term sexual dysfunction after treatment for colorectal cancer

Kathrin Milbury, Lorenzo Cohen, Rosell Jenkins, John M Skibber, Leslie R Schover

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Colorectal cancer patients usually receive treatments (e.g., pelvic surgery or radiotherapy, colostomy) that increase their risk for sexual problems. Previous research has mainly focused on demographic and medical risk factors. Because little is known about the role of psychosocial variables in sexual dysfunction, this research sought to identify the contribution of demographic, medical, and psychosocial factors to sexual dysfunction using multivariate analyses. Methods: Male and female colorectal cancer survivors (N = 261; mean, 2.5 years post-treatment) completed paper-pencil questionnaires assessing sexual function, psychosocial variables (e.g., depression, social support, body image, and dyadic adjustment), and demographics. Medical information was obtained from patients' self-report and medical records. Results: Multiple regression analyses revealed that older age, having received destructive surgery (i.e., abdominoperineal resection), and poor social support were uniquely and significantly associated with low international index of erectile function scores in men. For women, low female sexual function index scores were significantly associated with older age and poor global quality of life. Men, but not women, with rectal cancer reported worse sexual function compared to those with colon cancer. Conclusions: Sexual dysfunction after colorectal cancer treatment is related to demographic, medical, and psychosocial factors. These associations can help to identify patients at high risk of sexual problems in order to assist restoring sexual functioning if desired.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)793-802
Number of pages10
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2013

Fingerprint

Colorectal Neoplasms
Demography
Psychology
Social Support
Social Adjustment
Colostomy
Body Image
Therapeutics
Rectal Neoplasms
Research
Colonic Neoplasms
Self Report
Medical Records
Survivors
Radiotherapy
Multivariate Analysis
Regression Analysis
Quality of Life
Depression

Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer survivors
  • Psychosocial risk factors
  • Treatment-related sexual dysfunction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

The association between psychosocial and medical factors with long-term sexual dysfunction after treatment for colorectal cancer. / Milbury, Kathrin; Cohen, Lorenzo; Jenkins, Rosell; Skibber, John M; Schover, Leslie R.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, Vol. 21, No. 3, 01.03.2013, p. 793-802.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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